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Nebraska Corn Board seeks candidates for vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the terms for three members of the Nebraska Corn Development, Utilization and Marketing Board, also known as the Nebraska Corn Board, will expire June 30, 2021, and Nebraska’s corn checkoff program is seeking candidates to petition for those districts. The open position...

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Nebraska Corn Board seeks candidates for vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the terms for three members of the Nebraska Corn Development, Utilization and Marketing Board, also known as the Nebraska Corn Board, will expire June 30, 2021, and Nebraska’s corn checkoff program is seeking candidates to petition for those districts. The open position...

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Audio: Rural Radio Network says goodbye to market analyst

For nearly three decades, Laddie Wilson with Wolcott and Lincoln in Kansas City has been a consistent market voice on KRVN and the Rural Radio Network. However, Wilson said, "It's time to let a younger analyst in and share his knowledge on the market." Wilson started his marketing career manag...

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Peterson requests delay in nation-wide 5G network implementation

Outgoing House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson and others on the committee seek a delay in deploying a terrestrial nationwide network to provide 5G services. In a letter last week to the House Appropriations Committee, Peterson says, “There is no room for error when discussing sa...

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The Monday Fontanelle Final Bell with Mike Zuzolo of Global Commodity Analytics

Post-Thanksgiving pull back-how long will it last Restaurants & food consumption with COVID Dry weather & its effects on wheat Is China blamed for recent global prices?   ...

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AUDIO: Market commentary with daily brokers

Summary The market comes out of it's turkey coma and decides to hit the sell button on Monday. Stocks were unimpressed with Moderna pharmaceutical's announcement of seeking FDA approval to distribute it's Covid-19 vaccine. Most analyst already saw this as a known quantity and not occurring soon e...

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Crops

Audio: Rural Radio Network says goodbye to market analyst

For nearly three decades, Laddie Wilson with Wolcott and Lincoln in Kansas City has been a consistent market voice on KRVN and the Rural Radio Network. However, Wilson said, "It's time to let a younger analyst in and share his knowledge on the market." Wilson started his marketing career managing a grain coop in western Nebraska. In 1991, Wilson was offered an opportunity to work with Jim Hansen and Union Equity in Kansas City. Hansen at the time handled all of the radio reports, but he soon had Wilson filling in for him and taking over the radio report when he retired. In an exclusive interview with the Rural Radio Network, Wilson remarked on how much had changed in the commodity trading world since he started. He said the Kansas City Board of Trade no longer being in existence stands out as one of the most significant changes. Of course, how trades are placed has drastically changed, too. Gone are the days of calling a runner who would place the order to traders in the pit. Today, Wilson simply types the order into a computer and away it goes. Influences in the market have also changed over the years. Wilson highlighted that the market is now global, and what happens half way around the world impacts prices at home. Wilson plans to continue working for Wolcott and Lincoln for the foreseeable future and continue helping farmers and ranchers manage their price risk. You can listen to the entire interview here:

The Monday Fontanelle Final Bell with Mike Zuzolo of Global Commodity Analytics

Post-Thanksgiving pull back-how long will it last Restaurants & food consumption with COVID Dry weather & its effects on wheat Is China blamed for recent global prices?  

AUDIO: Market commentary with daily brokers

Summary The market comes out of it's turkey coma and decides to hit the sell button on Monday. Stocks were unimpressed with Moderna pharmaceutical's announcement of seeking FDA approval to distribute it's Covid-19 vaccine. Most analyst already saw this as a known quantity and not occurring soon enough to save off the economic hardship crated by new lock downs. Economic data on Monday also showed that the US economy is still expanding, but at the slowest pace since August. The Chicago Fed PMI (purchasing mangers index) fell from 61.1 in October to 58.2 in November. Why haven't soybeans traded over $12? | Monday Morning Markets | Nov. 30, 2020 The grain complex started the week lower. With limited trade on Friday grains started the overnight session higher, but quickly saw heavy selling into the open. South American weather has turned with both the GFS and European models showing better chances for rain over the next two weeks in Brazil and Argentina. The reality of the market is this was likely to happen sooner rather than later. More chances of moisture in South America does not indicate that the crop is saved and yields will be massive. However it gives the market a chance to catch it's breath and allow some profit taking. Of course in the modern trading world momentum is a big driver and helps to exacerbate swings to the downside and upside. The demand side of the grain market continues to be strong with USDA announcing the flash sale of 140,000 MT of corn to unknown destinations Monday morning. USDA export inspections for the week of November 26th were also strong with corn at 890,000 MT, soybeans at 2.04 MMT, and wheat at 502,000 MT. For the soybeans in particular China was the destination for about 1.67 MMT. USDA soybean exports are 44% of the entire 2020 goal which is about 10% higher than usual this time of year. Livestock kicked the week off with lean hogs finding strength when the rest of the market was weak. With Thanksgiving in the rear view mirror and Christmas ahead pork demand in the US is expected increase. Pork prices are also increasing in China as covid testing slows meat movement. China reported 25 cold-chain linked COVID-19 cases in November, up from 4 in October. Testing requirements are increasing for meat entering the country, and there are some signs of consumer backlash as well. Testing protocols are slowing movement of meat through the ports, tightening supplies within China, which is raising prices ahead of the approaching Lunar New Year holiday shopping in early 2021. Feeder cattle were also able to move higher as more spreads with grain were taken off. Typically though cattle futures encounter more selling pressure after thanksgiving through the first of the new year. Midday carcass cutouts on Monday were strong for cattle and hogs, but load count was limited as supply chains get moving again after the holiday. Business took place mostly on Wednesday with a little cleanup on Friday last week. Southern live deals had a full range of $110 to mostly $111, generally $1 higher than the prior week's weighted averages. Northern dressed deals ranged from $170 to mostly $174, generally $2 higher than the previous week's weighted average basis Nebraska. For the week ending November 21, 2020, Imported Beef Passed for Entry in the U.S. totaled 37,488, 93.84% of the previous week and 95.66% of the 4-week average. Expected Slaughter numbers Monday Cattle 119,000 hd today 120,000 hd wk ago 119,379 hd yr ago Hogs 492,000 hd today 492,000 hd wk ago 496,360 hd yr ago Midday Carcass Value Monday Beef Choice up 1.17 244.02 Select up 1.48 222.16 C/S Spread  21.86 Loads  45 Pork Carcass up 8.17 88.13 Bellies up 32.87 123.56 Loads 114 Grain Settlements Corn dn 5 3/4 - 7 3/4 Soybeans dn 19 1/2 -23 1/4 Chicago Wht dn 18 1/4 - 21 Kansas City Wht  dn 15 3/4 - 18 1/2 Livestock Settlements Live Cattle dn 0.22 - 0.57 Feeder Cattle up 0.62 - 1.22 Lean Hogs up 0.97 - 1.70 Class III Milk dn 0.15 - 0.17 Pre-Opening Market Broker Commentary Ed Dugan, Top Third Ag Marketing, discusses overnight grains and what the trade may see today. Grains are pulling back in the overnight trade. Jerry Stowell, Country Futures,  looks at what may impact the livestock futures today. Cattle seasonally hit selling pressure until first of the year. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, takes a look at the midday trade. Grain bulls are losing their weather market. Traders are catching up from a long weekend. John Payne, Daniel's Ag Marketing, takes a closer look at today's grain close. Payne defends the bull market and believes  money will step back into the market at the right price. Jack Fenske, York Commodities, looks at the closing market numbers. Fenske is cautious grains through the middle of the month.

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Livestock

Audio: Rural Radio Network says goodbye to market analyst

For nearly three decades, Laddie Wilson with Wolcott and Lincoln in Kansas City has been a consistent market voice on KRVN and the Rural Radio Network. However, Wilson said, "It's time to let a younger analyst in and share his knowledge on the market." Wilson started his marketing career managing a grain coop in western Nebraska. In 1991, Wilson was offered an opportunity to work with Jim Hansen and Union Equity in Kansas City. Hansen at the time handled all of the radio reports, but he soon had Wilson filling in for him and taking over the radio report when he retired. In an exclusive interview with the Rural Radio Network, Wilson remarked on how much had changed in the commodity trading world since he started. He said the Kansas City Board of Trade no longer being in existence stands out as one of the most significant changes. Of course, how trades are placed has drastically changed, too. Gone are the days of calling a runner who would place the order to traders in the pit. Today, Wilson simply types the order into a computer and away it goes. Influences in the market have also changed over the years. Wilson highlighted that the market is now global, and what happens half way around the world impacts prices at home. Wilson plans to continue working for Wolcott and Lincoln for the foreseeable future and continue helping farmers and ranchers manage their price risk. You can listen to the entire interview here:

The Monday Fontanelle Final Bell with Mike Zuzolo of Global Commodity Analytics

Post-Thanksgiving pull back-how long will it last Restaurants & food consumption with COVID Dry weather & its effects on wheat Is China blamed for recent global prices?  

AUDIO: Market commentary with daily brokers

Summary The market comes out of it's turkey coma and decides to hit the sell button on Monday. Stocks were unimpressed with Moderna pharmaceutical's announcement of seeking FDA approval to distribute it's Covid-19 vaccine. Most analyst already saw this as a known quantity and not occurring soon enough to save off the economic hardship crated by new lock downs. Economic data on Monday also showed that the US economy is still expanding, but at the slowest pace since August. The Chicago Fed PMI (purchasing mangers index) fell from 61.1 in October to 58.2 in November. Why haven't soybeans traded over $12? | Monday Morning Markets | Nov. 30, 2020 The grain complex started the week lower. With limited trade on Friday grains started the overnight session higher, but quickly saw heavy selling into the open. South American weather has turned with both the GFS and European models showing better chances for rain over the next two weeks in Brazil and Argentina. The reality of the market is this was likely to happen sooner rather than later. More chances of moisture in South America does not indicate that the crop is saved and yields will be massive. However it gives the market a chance to catch it's breath and allow some profit taking. Of course in the modern trading world momentum is a big driver and helps to exacerbate swings to the downside and upside. The demand side of the grain market continues to be strong with USDA announcing the flash sale of 140,000 MT of corn to unknown destinations Monday morning. USDA export inspections for the week of November 26th were also strong with corn at 890,000 MT, soybeans at 2.04 MMT, and wheat at 502,000 MT. For the soybeans in particular China was the destination for about 1.67 MMT. USDA soybean exports are 44% of the entire 2020 goal which is about 10% higher than usual this time of year. Livestock kicked the week off with lean hogs finding strength when the rest of the market was weak. With Thanksgiving in the rear view mirror and Christmas ahead pork demand in the US is expected increase. Pork prices are also increasing in China as covid testing slows meat movement. China reported 25 cold-chain linked COVID-19 cases in November, up from 4 in October. Testing requirements are increasing for meat entering the country, and there are some signs of consumer backlash as well. Testing protocols are slowing movement of meat through the ports, tightening supplies within China, which is raising prices ahead of the approaching Lunar New Year holiday shopping in early 2021. Feeder cattle were also able to move higher as more spreads with grain were taken off. Typically though cattle futures encounter more selling pressure after thanksgiving through the first of the new year. Midday carcass cutouts on Monday were strong for cattle and hogs, but load count was limited as supply chains get moving again after the holiday. Business took place mostly on Wednesday with a little cleanup on Friday last week. Southern live deals had a full range of $110 to mostly $111, generally $1 higher than the prior week's weighted averages. Northern dressed deals ranged from $170 to mostly $174, generally $2 higher than the previous week's weighted average basis Nebraska. For the week ending November 21, 2020, Imported Beef Passed for Entry in the U.S. totaled 37,488, 93.84% of the previous week and 95.66% of the 4-week average. Expected Slaughter numbers Monday Cattle 119,000 hd today 120,000 hd wk ago 119,379 hd yr ago Hogs 492,000 hd today 492,000 hd wk ago 496,360 hd yr ago Midday Carcass Value Monday Beef Choice up 1.17 244.02 Select up 1.48 222.16 C/S Spread  21.86 Loads  45 Pork Carcass up 8.17 88.13 Bellies up 32.87 123.56 Loads 114 Grain Settlements Corn dn 5 3/4 - 7 3/4 Soybeans dn 19 1/2 -23 1/4 Chicago Wht dn 18 1/4 - 21 Kansas City Wht  dn 15 3/4 - 18 1/2 Livestock Settlements Live Cattle dn 0.22 - 0.57 Feeder Cattle up 0.62 - 1.22 Lean Hogs up 0.97 - 1.70 Class III Milk dn 0.15 - 0.17 Pre-Opening Market Broker Commentary Ed Dugan, Top Third Ag Marketing, discusses overnight grains and what the trade may see today. Grains are pulling back in the overnight trade. Jerry Stowell, Country Futures,  looks at what may impact the livestock futures today. Cattle seasonally hit selling pressure until first of the year. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, takes a look at the midday trade. Grain bulls are losing their weather market. Traders are catching up from a long weekend. John Payne, Daniel's Ag Marketing, takes a closer look at today's grain close. Payne defends the bull market and believes  money will step back into the market at the right price. Jack Fenske, York Commodities, looks at the closing market numbers. Fenske is cautious grains through the middle of the month.

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Technology

Peterson requests delay in nation-wide 5G network implementation

Outgoing House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson and others on the committee seek a delay in deploying a terrestrial nationwide network to provide 5G services. In a letter last week to the House Appropriations Committee, Peterson says, “There is no room for error when discussing safety and reliability of service for GPS signals.” In July, a group of lawmakers led by Peterson expressed serious concerns surrounding the FCC's decision, questioning the reliability of GPS for millions of Americans, especially farmers and ranchers who rely on the technology for precision agriculture. Peterson was joined by Republicans Glenn GT Thompson of Pennsylvania and James Comer of Kentucky. Specifically, the lawmakers want the FCC to delay an order granting Ligado Networks 5G development. Representative Comer states, “critical tools like GPS technology must not be disrupted, as our farmers are essential workers who must have the tools they need to do their jobs.” The lawmakers hope appropriation bills will include the delay.

(AUDIO) Gothenburg FFA senior reflects on national chorus experience, shares future plans

A senior Gothenburg FFA member rounded out his National FFA Convention experience with a spot in the National FFA Chorus. For a second year, Seth Daup was a member of the National FFA Chorus, but this year, the experience was much different. Daup said each member was tasked with recording his or her piece of the song at home to a pre-recorded video of the director conducting the song. Last year was Daup’s first year in the National FFA Chorus, and he said he met many lifelong friends from around the country. “It’s probably one of the best experiences I’ve ever had,” said Daup. “I now have friends from Alaska and Puerto Rico.” The performance can be viewed here. In addition to his FFA involvement on the national level, Daup also leads on the local level by serving as his chapter’s vice president. He said their chapter organizes a blood drive, food drive, fruit sales, and more. Daup hopes to pursue computer engineering in college, and in the past year, he’s recognized how computer engineering plays an important role in agriculture and everyday life. “Especially this year with Covid, we were unable to have those mass gatherings, and so I’m able to use my technology skills to help my chapter,” said Daup. Daup has stayed busy this year organizing Zoom meetings, putting together virtual presentations, and building a website for his chapter. He added that FFA has granted him experiences that he might not have had otherwise. “It is an opportunity like no other.”

Hard white wheat demonstrates good quality

MANHATTAN, Kan. — The Kansas hard white (HW) wheat crop is exhibiting good milling and baking quality, even though production was down in 2020, according to the annual Crop Quality Report published by U.S. Wheat Associates (USW). Released last week, the report includes grade, flour and baking data for all six U.S. wheat classes. The report includes analysis of hundreds of samples collected during and after harvest to provide objective information for the world’s wheat buyers. “We are pleased to share the 2020 U.S. Wheat Crop Quality Report with our customers, partners and friends,” said Vince Peterson, USW president. “While the global pandemic kept us apart in distance, it was not going to prevent us from providing the information customers need to put the six U.S. wheat classes to work in their businesses. U.S. wheat farmers produced another abundant supply of wheat with a very useful range of functional characteristics.” According to the report, the 2020 HW wheat crop demonstrated good quality in milling performance, dough properties and in finished products like pan breads, Asian noodles and steamed breads. USW and member organizations like the Kansas Wheat Commission are now taking this analysis out to customers to discuss both last year’s quality and the outlook for the HW wheat just planted. Matt Overturf, director of grain marketing for Skyland Grain, LLC, with its corporate location in Johnson, Kansas, echoed the good quality of this year’s HW wheat crop, despite a significant drop in production. The company only took in about 40 percent of their five-year average, with an even more substantial drop year-over-year. This decreased production was driven by crop rotations into other dryland crops and substantial drought conditions in the western parts of the state where the majority of HW is grown. Despite lower acres, Overturf reported the HW wheat delivered to their locations had good protein and test weights. He also said the company’s location in Cunningham (Kingman County) took in HW wheat for the first time and it was also of good quality. While the majority of this wheat is destined for domestic use, Skyland has made some sales to Nigeria prior to the start of the competing Australian harvest. Looking forward, Overturf expects HW production in western Kansas to rebound substantially, in part due to prevent plant acres from this summer that shifted back to wheat production. Farmers in western Kansas also benefit from varieties like Joe that include resistance to diseases like Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus, and KS Silverado, which is growing in popularity in central Kansas. He reported the HW wheat now in the ground is off to a good start, but farmers are keeping their fingers crossed for moisture soon to support plant growth. “If we can catch moisture, we have a really good stand here,” Overturf said. “Our farmers like to grow HW wheat out here and we like handling it. When somebody is looking for HW to buy, they can come to us and we usually have a pretty good supply.” Learn more about the quality analysis of the 2020 HW crop at https://www.uswheat.org/wheatletter/good-performance-in-limited-exportable-hard-white-supplies-for-2020/.

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Ag Policy

Nebraska Corn Board seeks candidates for vacancies

Notice is hereby given that the terms for three members of the Nebraska Corn Development, Utilization and Marketing Board, also known as the Nebraska Corn Board, will expire June 30, 2021, and Nebraska’s corn checkoff program is seeking candidates to petition for those districts. The open positions represent Districts 6, 7 and 8. District 6 - Includes the counties of Hayes, Frontier, Gosper, Phelps, Kearney, Hitchcock, Red Willow, Furnas and Harlan (Note: Ted Schrock, the current District 6 director, has indicated he will pursue re-appointment.) District 7 - Includes the counties of Boyd, Holt, Antelope, Garfield, Wheeler, Boone, Platte, Valley, Greeley and Nance. (Note: David Merrell, the current District 7 director, has indicated he will not pursue re-appointment.) District 8 - Includes the counties of Sioux, Dawes, Box Butte, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, Kimball, Morrill, Cheyenne, Garden, Deuel, Cherry, Keya Paha, Brown, Rock, Grant, Hooker, Thomas, Blaine, Loup, Arthur, McPherson, Logan, Custer, Keith, Lincoln, Perkins, Chase, and Dundy. (Note: Andy Groskopf, the current District 8 director, has indicated that he will pursue re-election.) “Through my years serving on the Nebraska Corn Board, I was able to take an active role in shaping demand opportunities and adding value to our state’s corn industry,” said David Merrell, current District 7 director and farmer from St. Edward. “By the end of my term, I will have represented District 7 for 15 years. I enjoyed my time on the board and encourage farmers from these open districts who are passionate about the future of the corn industry to consider submitting petitions.” Appointments to the board for these three district directors are made by the Governor of Nebraska. Any candidate seeking appointment may place his or her name on the candidacy list by filing a petition with the Nebraska Corn Board. Qualified candidates include those individuals who are citizens of Nebraska, are at least 21 years old, have been actively engaged in growing corn in Nebraska for a period of five years and derive a substantial portion of their income from growing corn. Board members who currently represent these districts are also eligible to re-petition. Petitions may be obtained by writing the Nebraska Corn Board (P.O. Box 95107, Lincoln, NE 68509-5107), by calling 800-632-6761 or emailing nikki.bentzinger@nebraska.gov. A candidacy petition must carry the signatures of at least 50 corn producers from that district. All petitions must be received by the Nebraska Corn Board no later than 5:00 p.m. Central Time on Friday, May 21, 2021. Faxed copies do not qualify.

USDA alters Service Center status at locations across state in response to Coronavirus

LINCOLN, Nebraska, Nov. 30, 2020 — The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is temporarily restricting in-person visits for numerous Service Centers in Nebraska because of elevated rates of coronavirus community spread, but USDA employees will continue to assist agricultural producers with programs and services. USDA is using a phased, data-driven approach to determine which Service Centers are open for in-person appointments. Field work, including conservation planning assistance, will continue with appropriate social distancing. “While many of our Service Centers across Nebraska will be physically closed to visitors, we remain open for business,” said Nancy Johner, State Executive Director for USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) in Nebraska. Added Craig Derickson, State Conservationist for USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Nebraska, “Throughout the pandemic, our work with producers has continued, and we remain committed to serving our customers.” All USDA Service Centers are for open for business, and Service Center staff members from FSA and NRCS will continue to work with producers by phone, email, and digital tools like Microsoft Teams, Box, and OneSpan. Producers can learn more about how to use these digital offerings by visiting https://www.farmers.gov/mydocs. Producers wishing to conduct business with the FSA, NRCS, or any other Service Center agency should call ahead to confirm and schedule appointments. More information on Service Center status can be found at https://www.farmers.gov/coronavirus/service-center-status, and contact information for local Service Centers is available at https://www.farmers.gov/service-center-locator.

Organic groups send recommendations to transition team

The Organic Trade Association and the National Organic Coalition recently sent industry recommendations to President-elect Joe Biden's transition team. In a letter to the transition team, the groups say, "here are several overarching issues that need to be addressed early in your Administration to put organic agriculture back on safe footing after the challenges of the past four years.” Those issues include implementation of the Obama-Biden Organic Animal Welfare Rule. The groups also call for the finalization of Organic Origin of Livestock Regulations, and finalization of the Strengthening Organic Enforcement Rule. Other priorities for the organic industry include restoring the Organic Certification Cost Share Program to the full Reimbursement Rates Mandated by the 2018 Farm Bill, and embracing organic agriculture as a key climate change solution. Additionally, the groups say, “We encourage your Administration to engage the U.S. food and agriculture sector in a dialogue about how we can best use the lessons learned from the pandemic to build our food system back, better than it was before.”

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Markets

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