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Rural Radio Network

LIVE | 2020 Aksarben Stock Show underway in Grand Island

The Rural Radio Network recently announced that it has partnered with the Aksarben Stock Show to provide livestream videos of the livestock shows. The show will take place Sept. 25-27, 2020. The livestream began on Friday morning with Breeding Doe Show. WATCH: Find the full Aksarben Sto...

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LIVE | 2020 Aksarben Stock Show underway in Grand Island

The Rural Radio Network recently announced that it has partnered with the Aksarben Stock Show to provide livestream videos of the livestock shows. The show will take place Sept. 25-27, 2020. The livestream began on Friday morning with Breeding Doe Show. WATCH: Find the full Aksarben Sto...

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Cattle Call looks at potential for higher cash for cattle

Cash cattle to go higher Box beef to go down We might finally be caught up Will we rally after October 1? A little bit of sales earlier in the week Big margins for the packers https://youtu.be/8j9IkPtbxXI...

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Midwest lawmakers Seek Funding for Missouri River Navigation

Lawmakers from Lower Missouri River states this week penned a letter urging the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide additional funding for navigation projects along the river. The lawmakers say many farmers, industries and small businesses in the Midwest rely on the Missouri River to transpor...

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The Thursday Fontanelle Final Bell Troy Nielson with Smart Yield

Right in the middle of soybean harvest Export information on corn & beans South America...where are they at with their crops Quarterly stocks report...how does that affect the markets & compare to the October WASDE US Weather & harvest     ...

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AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Can we go back to last week? It was a lot easier to talk about the markets then because they were moving higher. This past Monday though threw the brakes on everything putting the market into an old fashioned risk off atmosphere. Tuesday tried to mount a comeback, but there has been plent...

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Crops

The Thursday Fontanelle Final Bell Troy Nielson with Smart Yield

Right in the middle of soybean harvest Export information on corn & beans South America...where are they at with their crops Quarterly stocks report...how does that affect the markets & compare to the October WASDE US Weather & harvest    

AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Can we go back to last week? It was a lot easier to talk about the markets then because they were moving higher. This past Monday though threw the brakes on everything putting the market into an old fashioned risk off atmosphere. Tuesday tried to mount a comeback, but there has been plenty of selling since. Friday is likely to be indifferent as still weighing heavy on the macro or broad market picture is the possibility of another round of US stimulus being on hold as the death of a Supreme Court Justice has the Congress and President's full attention. The financial sector has also been thrown into turmoil this week with reports  of fraud and money laundering stinging some of the worlds largest banks including HSBC, Barclays and Deutsche . Enough of the doom and gloom there has been some positive economic data on the week. Starting on Tuesday the weekly Redbook showed year on year retail sales up 1.5% for last week. That was better than the previous week's -1.2%. It was also the first positive retail sales growth since late July/early August. One week doesn't mean a lot in the big picture, but it could be a start to some retail resurgence. Wednesday saw more positive housing data with MBA Mortgage applications rising 6.8% on the week ending September 18, after falling 2.5% on the week prior; new home purchases rose 3.4% after falling 0.5% in the previous week, while refinancing's increased by a sharp 8.8% on the week to last Friday, after declining by 3.7% in the week prior. These were strong numbers despite a rebound in the average 30-year mortgage rate to the highest level since mid-August (though that’s still only 3.10%); mortgage applications are up 25% year-over-year despite rising prices, with some economists pointing to a massive overall pandemic shift to the “home office” going forward – U.S. workers are investing more in their homes with the new norm. Existing home sales rose to an annualized rate of 6.000 million in August, up 2.4% from the 5.860 million unit pace in July and slightly above analyst expectations of 5.965 million. The August increase follows a robust 24.7% increase in July as people rushed to take advantage of record low mortgage rates. The pace of August existing home sales was up 10.5% year-on-year, up from an 8.7% year-on-year pace in July. The housing market continues to be one of the hottest sectors of the economy, due to those low interest rates. Energy production data on Wednesday showed US crude oil stocks down 1.6 million barrels. Which was better than what many expected. Unfortunately US gasoline and other distillates actually increased. As a result energy futures were mixed. For the week ending September 18 US ethanol production decreased 2.2%, or 21,000 barrels per day (b/d), to 906,000 b/d. US ethanol stocks in the same time frame increased 1.0%, 20,000 barrels to 20.0 million barrels, which was 11.1% below year-ago volumes. Inventories increased across all regions except the Midwest (PADD 2) and Rocky Mountains (PADD 4). The volume of gasoline supplied to the U.S. market, a measure of implied demand, ticked up 0.4% to 8.52 million b/d (130.53 bg annualized). Gasoline demand remained 8.9% lower than a year ago. Grain bulls are lost steam from last week's strong gains and almost gave fully into the bears. Thursday's trade did see a little resilience in the wheat markets with Chicago settling in the green. That could be helped with dry conditions in the US hard red winter wheat belt. Along with developing La Nina conditions in the pacific. Argentina also saw a late frost on their wheat crop this week. Although damage is not suspected to be huge. As for corn a rising dollar is putting the breaks on energy futures. That is hurting ethanol margins and in turn corn demand. The latest crop progress report also shows harvest is starting around the country for most row crops and outside of Iowa most yields aren't horrible. Soybeans had an impressive run to the upside the last couple of weeks. That has come to an end this week with most of the contracts now back below $10. Going into the week the funds were heavy in the soybeans with open interest rising to 974,373 contracts, which was just below the record open interest posted in early 2017. However with the heavy selling this week that open interest has quickly retracted. That could have helped create momentum for the computer traders to push the market lower. USDA announced sales up to Thursday when for the first time since September 2nd there were no sales to announce. On Monday the USDA announced sales of 171,000 MT of soybeans to unknown destinations, 132,000 MT of soybeans to China and 132,000 MT of soybeans to Pakistan.  Tuesday USDA announced 4 flash sales. Two to China; 266,000 MT of soybeans and 140,000 MT of corn. Two to unknown destinations; 264,000 MT of soybeans and 320,000 MT of corn. Wednesday China purchased 132,000 MT of soybeans. Unknown destinations purchased 126,000 MT of soybeans. Livestock ended mixed on Thursday just ahead of the quarterly hogs and pigs report from USDA. Overall it seems cattle are taking full advantage of a soft lean hog market and moving higher. Cattle were also supported with increase export sales from USDA. Last week beef net export sales increased 26%. Beef exports increased 24%. Pork net export sales on the other hand dropped 25% from last week's huge sale. China and Mexico were still the top buyers though. Pork exports were up 25% though with China taking delivery of nearly 11,000 MT. As for the quarterly hogs and pigs report the data was neutral to slightly bearish showing a slight increase in market ready hogs from the June report. Analysts are debating the data though suggesting that a larger market hog supply would not be justifying the current strong cash market. Tuesday the cold storage report showed a monthly build in frozen red meat, but still well below year ago levels. Total red meat supplies in freezers were up 3% from the previous month but down 13% from last year. Total pounds of beef in freezers were up 5% from the previous month but down 2% from last year. Frozen pork supplies were up 2% from the previous month but down 23% from last year. Stocks of pork bellies were down 28% from last month and down 33% from last year. In the country on Thursday cash finally started to develop on the week. Up to this point cash had been very light and not enough to establish a full market trend. The waiting though has paid off for the feeders that held out as Southern live trade was $105 and Northern dressed trade was $165. Both $2 higher than last week's weighted averages. The Fed Cattle Exchange Auction today listed a total of 683 head (two lots each in Kansas and Texas), of which 219 actually sold, 195 head were listed as unsold, and 269 head were listed as PO (Passed Offer). The state by state breakdown looks like this: TX 417 total head, with 148 head sold at $104.25, 0 head unsold, 269 head listed as PO ($104.25); KS 266 total head, with 71 head sold at $104.00, 195 head unsold, and 0 head listed as PO. The delivery date/price range breakdown is as listed: 1-9 day delivery: 464 head total, of which none sold; 1-17 day delivery 219 head total, all sold, with a price range of $104.00 to $104.25. For the week ending September 12, 2020, Imported Beef Passed for Entry in the U.S. totaled 36,388, 84.37% of the previous week and 81.60% of the 4-week average. Expected Slaughter numbers Friday Cattle 120,000 hd today 117,000 hd wk ago 114,122 hd yr ago Saturday 49,000 hd Sat. 53,000 hd wk ago 66,598 hd yr ago Hogs 483,000 hd today 482,000 hd wk ago 481,661 hd yr ago Saturday 225,000 hd Sat. 187,000 hd wk ago 284,954 hd yr ago Midday Carcass Value Thursday Beef Choice up 1.71 215.78 Select up 0.59 208.19 C/S Spread 9.39 Loads  75 Pork Carcass up 0.77 89.74 Bellies up 1.06 151.73 Loads 149 Grain Settlements Corn dn 3 -  5 1/4 Soybeans dn 2 1/2 - 16 1/4 Chicago Wht dn 1/4 up 3/4 Kansas City Wht dn 1/2 - 1 1/2 Livestock Settlements Live Cattle up 0.62 - 1.07 Feeder Cattle up 0.45 - 1.20 Lean Hogs dn 0.02 -1.07 Class III Milk dn 0.02 - 0.35 Pre-Opening Market Broker Commentary Mark Gold, Top Third Ag Marketing, discusses overnight grains and what the trade may see today. Unknown destinations were back in the market for soybean meal. Jerry Stowell, Country Futures,  looks at what may impact the livestock futures today. Quarterly hogs and pigs report may prove bearish for the lean hog market . Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, takes a look at the midday trade. Wheat, weather and the dollar will be the market segments to watch into the close. John Payne, Daniel's Ag Marketing, takes a closer look at today's grain close. Grains end mixed on Thursday. Payne believes it might take a South American crop issue to leg prices higher. Jack Fenske, York Commodities, looks at the closing market numbers. Grains could have put highs in, but Fenske says seasonally grains put highs in next week.

(VIDEO) Nebraska orchard prepares for fall season

Fall is officially here, and one Nebraska orchard is ready to ring in the season. Martin’s Hillside Orchard is located just outside of Ceresco, Nebraska, which is north of Lincoln. Owner Alex Martin said they opened up for the season on Labor Day weekend, and it’s provided a great way for Lincoln, Omaha and surrounding residents to spend time outdoors while social distancing. “We have a little more space devoted to what we’re doing than people have in their backyards,” said Martin. “The majority of the people who come out are either from Lincoln or Omaha.” Listen to the story here. Martin said the orchard has been open to the public for 15 years, and it’s seen quite a few changes in those years. Ultimately, Martin said he wants visitors to have fun exploring nature and go home with a greater appreciation of plants and plant-based agriculture. Visitors can pick apples, raspberries, peaches and pumpkins at the U-Pick orchard. In addition, the orchard has a corn maze, gourd cave, straw-tower, butterfly garden, discovery trail and more. The orchard is open for the season through Oct. 31. Learn more about Martin’s Hillside Orchard and view their U-Pick schedule at hillside-orchard.com.

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Livestock

LIVE | 2020 Aksarben Stock Show underway in Grand Island

The Rural Radio Network recently announced that it has partnered with the Aksarben Stock Show to provide livestream videos of the livestock shows. The show will take place Sept. 25-27, 2020. The livestream began on Friday morning with Breeding Doe Show. WATCH: Find the full Aksarben Stock Show show schedule here.

Cattle Call looks at potential for higher cash for cattle

Cash cattle to go higher Box beef to go down We might finally be caught up Will we rally after October 1? A little bit of sales earlier in the week Big margins for the packers https://youtu.be/8j9IkPtbxXI

AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Can we go back to last week? It was a lot easier to talk about the markets then because they were moving higher. This past Monday though threw the brakes on everything putting the market into an old fashioned risk off atmosphere. Tuesday tried to mount a comeback, but there has been plenty of selling since. Friday is likely to be indifferent as still weighing heavy on the macro or broad market picture is the possibility of another round of US stimulus being on hold as the death of a Supreme Court Justice has the Congress and President's full attention. The financial sector has also been thrown into turmoil this week with reports  of fraud and money laundering stinging some of the worlds largest banks including HSBC, Barclays and Deutsche . Enough of the doom and gloom there has been some positive economic data on the week. Starting on Tuesday the weekly Redbook showed year on year retail sales up 1.5% for last week. That was better than the previous week's -1.2%. It was also the first positive retail sales growth since late July/early August. One week doesn't mean a lot in the big picture, but it could be a start to some retail resurgence. Wednesday saw more positive housing data with MBA Mortgage applications rising 6.8% on the week ending September 18, after falling 2.5% on the week prior; new home purchases rose 3.4% after falling 0.5% in the previous week, while refinancing's increased by a sharp 8.8% on the week to last Friday, after declining by 3.7% in the week prior. These were strong numbers despite a rebound in the average 30-year mortgage rate to the highest level since mid-August (though that’s still only 3.10%); mortgage applications are up 25% year-over-year despite rising prices, with some economists pointing to a massive overall pandemic shift to the “home office” going forward – U.S. workers are investing more in their homes with the new norm. Existing home sales rose to an annualized rate of 6.000 million in August, up 2.4% from the 5.860 million unit pace in July and slightly above analyst expectations of 5.965 million. The August increase follows a robust 24.7% increase in July as people rushed to take advantage of record low mortgage rates. The pace of August existing home sales was up 10.5% year-on-year, up from an 8.7% year-on-year pace in July. The housing market continues to be one of the hottest sectors of the economy, due to those low interest rates. Energy production data on Wednesday showed US crude oil stocks down 1.6 million barrels. Which was better than what many expected. Unfortunately US gasoline and other distillates actually increased. As a result energy futures were mixed. For the week ending September 18 US ethanol production decreased 2.2%, or 21,000 barrels per day (b/d), to 906,000 b/d. US ethanol stocks in the same time frame increased 1.0%, 20,000 barrels to 20.0 million barrels, which was 11.1% below year-ago volumes. Inventories increased across all regions except the Midwest (PADD 2) and Rocky Mountains (PADD 4). The volume of gasoline supplied to the U.S. market, a measure of implied demand, ticked up 0.4% to 8.52 million b/d (130.53 bg annualized). Gasoline demand remained 8.9% lower than a year ago. Grain bulls are lost steam from last week's strong gains and almost gave fully into the bears. Thursday's trade did see a little resilience in the wheat markets with Chicago settling in the green. That could be helped with dry conditions in the US hard red winter wheat belt. Along with developing La Nina conditions in the pacific. Argentina also saw a late frost on their wheat crop this week. Although damage is not suspected to be huge. As for corn a rising dollar is putting the breaks on energy futures. That is hurting ethanol margins and in turn corn demand. The latest crop progress report also shows harvest is starting around the country for most row crops and outside of Iowa most yields aren't horrible. Soybeans had an impressive run to the upside the last couple of weeks. That has come to an end this week with most of the contracts now back below $10. Going into the week the funds were heavy in the soybeans with open interest rising to 974,373 contracts, which was just below the record open interest posted in early 2017. However with the heavy selling this week that open interest has quickly retracted. That could have helped create momentum for the computer traders to push the market lower. USDA announced sales up to Thursday when for the first time since September 2nd there were no sales to announce. On Monday the USDA announced sales of 171,000 MT of soybeans to unknown destinations, 132,000 MT of soybeans to China and 132,000 MT of soybeans to Pakistan.  Tuesday USDA announced 4 flash sales. Two to China; 266,000 MT of soybeans and 140,000 MT of corn. Two to unknown destinations; 264,000 MT of soybeans and 320,000 MT of corn. Wednesday China purchased 132,000 MT of soybeans. Unknown destinations purchased 126,000 MT of soybeans. Livestock ended mixed on Thursday just ahead of the quarterly hogs and pigs report from USDA. Overall it seems cattle are taking full advantage of a soft lean hog market and moving higher. Cattle were also supported with increase export sales from USDA. Last week beef net export sales increased 26%. Beef exports increased 24%. Pork net export sales on the other hand dropped 25% from last week's huge sale. China and Mexico were still the top buyers though. Pork exports were up 25% though with China taking delivery of nearly 11,000 MT. As for the quarterly hogs and pigs report the data was neutral to slightly bearish showing a slight increase in market ready hogs from the June report. Analysts are debating the data though suggesting that a larger market hog supply would not be justifying the current strong cash market. Tuesday the cold storage report showed a monthly build in frozen red meat, but still well below year ago levels. Total red meat supplies in freezers were up 3% from the previous month but down 13% from last year. Total pounds of beef in freezers were up 5% from the previous month but down 2% from last year. Frozen pork supplies were up 2% from the previous month but down 23% from last year. Stocks of pork bellies were down 28% from last month and down 33% from last year. In the country on Thursday cash finally started to develop on the week. Up to this point cash had been very light and not enough to establish a full market trend. The waiting though has paid off for the feeders that held out as Southern live trade was $105 and Northern dressed trade was $165. Both $2 higher than last week's weighted averages. The Fed Cattle Exchange Auction today listed a total of 683 head (two lots each in Kansas and Texas), of which 219 actually sold, 195 head were listed as unsold, and 269 head were listed as PO (Passed Offer). The state by state breakdown looks like this: TX 417 total head, with 148 head sold at $104.25, 0 head unsold, 269 head listed as PO ($104.25); KS 266 total head, with 71 head sold at $104.00, 195 head unsold, and 0 head listed as PO. The delivery date/price range breakdown is as listed: 1-9 day delivery: 464 head total, of which none sold; 1-17 day delivery 219 head total, all sold, with a price range of $104.00 to $104.25. For the week ending September 12, 2020, Imported Beef Passed for Entry in the U.S. totaled 36,388, 84.37% of the previous week and 81.60% of the 4-week average. Expected Slaughter numbers Friday Cattle 120,000 hd today 117,000 hd wk ago 114,122 hd yr ago Saturday 49,000 hd Sat. 53,000 hd wk ago 66,598 hd yr ago Hogs 483,000 hd today 482,000 hd wk ago 481,661 hd yr ago Saturday 225,000 hd Sat. 187,000 hd wk ago 284,954 hd yr ago Midday Carcass Value Thursday Beef Choice up 1.71 215.78 Select up 0.59 208.19 C/S Spread 9.39 Loads  75 Pork Carcass up 0.77 89.74 Bellies up 1.06 151.73 Loads 149 Grain Settlements Corn dn 3 -  5 1/4 Soybeans dn 2 1/2 - 16 1/4 Chicago Wht dn 1/4 up 3/4 Kansas City Wht dn 1/2 - 1 1/2 Livestock Settlements Live Cattle up 0.62 - 1.07 Feeder Cattle up 0.45 - 1.20 Lean Hogs dn 0.02 -1.07 Class III Milk dn 0.02 - 0.35 Pre-Opening Market Broker Commentary Mark Gold, Top Third Ag Marketing, discusses overnight grains and what the trade may see today. Unknown destinations were back in the market for soybean meal. Jerry Stowell, Country Futures,  looks at what may impact the livestock futures today. Quarterly hogs and pigs report may prove bearish for the lean hog market . Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, takes a look at the midday trade. Wheat, weather and the dollar will be the market segments to watch into the close. John Payne, Daniel's Ag Marketing, takes a closer look at today's grain close. Grains end mixed on Thursday. Payne believes it might take a South American crop issue to leg prices higher. Jack Fenske, York Commodities, looks at the closing market numbers. Grains could have put highs in, but Fenske says seasonally grains put highs in next week.

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Technology

Midwest lawmakers Seek Funding for Missouri River Navigation

Lawmakers from Lower Missouri River states this week penned a letter urging the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide additional funding for navigation projects along the river. The lawmakers say many farmers, industries and small businesses in the Midwest rely on the Missouri River to transport goods. High water levels and record flooding in 2019 have prevented the Corps of Engineers from completing repairs on water infrastructure projects, which has led to dangerous accidents that have significantly disrupted commerce on the river. The lawmakers write, “there is a critically dire situation related to navigation challenges in several areas along the Missouri River where serious barge traffic accidents have occurred.” The Corps’ Kansas City District has received $20 million in emergency supplemental funds to conduct work along the navigation channel. However, the lawmakers estimate the need at $200 million. The Corps estimates that high water in the last three years damaged 50-75 percent of the 7,000 river training structures that make up the Bank Stabilization and Navigation Project.

Rural Radio Network partners with Aksarben to livestream livestock shows

The Rural Radio Network recently announced that it has partnered with the Aksarben Stock Show to provide livestream videos of the livestock shows. The show will take place Sept. 25-27, 2020. The livestream will begin on Sept. 25 at 9 am, beginning with the Breeding Doe Show. Shows can be viewed on Rural Radio Network station KRVN’s YouTube Channel. Find the full show schedule here.

Legendary farm broadcaster Orion Samuelson to retire

A farm broadcasting legend recently announced his retirement effective at the end of this year, ending an over 60-year career. Orion Samuelson has been heard on WGN Radio in Chicago for decades. He also co-hosts "This Week in Agri-Business" with Max Armstrong. Samuelson's commitment to agriculture has been recognized by organizations including American Farm Bureau Federation, the state of Illinois, University of Illinois, National Radio Broadcaster Hall of Fame and others. Learn more about Samuelson and his retirement in this audio feature from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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Ag Policy

NDA director named president of midwest ag association

The head of the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) has been tapped to lead the Midwest Association of State Departments of Agriculture (MASDA). NDA Director Steve Wellman accepted the role of 2021-2022 President of MASDA during the Association’s annual meeting, which was held virtually earlier in September. MASDA is comprised of the Departments of Agriculture from 13 Midwestern states. In addition to Nebraska, MASDA includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Wisconsin. According to a news release from the NDA, in the role, Wellman will work with other state agricultural leaders in the Midwest to promote, support and advance ag producers, agribusinesses and the industry as a whole. “MASDA is where state ag leaders come together to represent agriculture in the Midwest,” Wellman said. “Each of our states has unique ag specialties and challenges, but we also share common goals, like creating new markets for our ag products and building on existing ones. This group addresses those challenges and goals and gives a unified voice to ag producers and agribusinesses in the Midwest.” Wellman will host the annual MASDA meeting in Nebraska in June of 2021.

Agreement reached to include CCC funds in CR

After days of partisan politics, a continuing resolution passed the House of Representatives Tuesday night including funds for the Commodity Credit Corporation. The White House and Congressional Republicans reached an agreement with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to include the funding, while prohibiting oil companies from accessing CCC funds. The Trump administration was exploring a plan to use up to $300 million of CCC funds for the oil industry, but dropped the proposal this week. In a statement, Pelosi says, “We have reached an agreement with Republicans on the CR to add nearly $8 billion in desperately needed nutrition assistance for hungry schoolchildren and families. We also increase accountability in the Commodity Credit Corporation, preventing funds for farmers from being misused for a Big Oil bailout.” Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, previously critical of Democrats withholding the funds, stated, “Democrats have heard our call, and the calls from farm country, to not ignore rural America when funding the government.” The CR funds the government through December 11.

USDA Seeks Comments on Pasture, Rangeland, Forage Rainfall Index Insurance Program

The Department of Agriculture seeks public comments on recommended improvements to the Pasture, Rangeland, Forage Rainfall Index Crop Insurance Program by November 5, 2020. USDA’s Risk Management Agency contracted for an independent evaluation of the program to determine its effectiveness as a risk management tool for livestock producers. RMA Administrator Martin Barbre says, “We want to be sure that the recommendations RMA implements are good for the industry and good for livestock producers.” In addition to the PRF program, the recommendations could be applied to other Rainfall Index programs such as beekeeping and Annual Forage. RMA will review all comments and determine what recommendations should be implemented for the 2022 crop year. The independent evaluation includes several recommendations, including adjusting the County Base Value productivity range, better targeting of indemnities, and focusing on viable forage production areas. Other recommendations include focusing on coverage on risk-reducing intervals and taking an alternative approach to reducing frequent shallow losses.

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Markets

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