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The Tuesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Mike Zuzolo of Global Commodity Analytics

Crop progress report Yield information that wasn’t a big surprise to the trade Collusion in grains? China buying more grain as they ramp up hog production Struggles in the cattle market     ...

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The Tuesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Mike Zuzolo of Global Commodity Analytics

Crop progress report Yield information that wasn’t a big surprise to the trade Collusion in grains? China buying more grain as they ramp up hog production Struggles in the cattle market     ...

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AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Tuesday afternoon's close looks like equities got part of a turn around Tuesday, but agriculture commodities got the full bear. Equities were able to mount a comeback after a soft open with positive economic reports coming from Wall Street. Traders are also still keeping in the back of...

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Nebraska Extension to host Calf Health Management on Arrival webinar series

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension will host the 2020 Calf  Health Management on Arrival webinar series. The webinars will take place weekly beginning on Aug. 18. The Calf Health Management on Arrival webinar series is designed to highlight management strategies relative to biocontainme...

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Mitigating heat stress in cattle via the Nebraska Mesonet

Extreme summer heat can be a cause for concern for feedlot operators and cattle producers in Nebraska. Heat causes stress and other negative impacts in cattle production. Cattle at a comfortable temperature are more productive, gain weight more efficiently and maintain a higher level of health. ...

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Nebraska FFA Foundation seeks donations for 2020 jacket program

The Nebraska FFA Foundation is now accepting donations for the 2020 Blue Jackets. Bright Futures program. Through the program, the foundation provides FFA members with a free FFA jacket and tie or scarf. Students must complete an application, which includes an advisor statement, and are selected ...

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Crops

The Tuesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Mike Zuzolo of Global Commodity Analytics

Crop progress report Yield information that wasn’t a big surprise to the trade Collusion in grains? China buying more grain as they ramp up hog production Struggles in the cattle market    

AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Tuesday afternoon's close looks like equities got part of a turn around Tuesday, but agriculture commodities got the full bear. Equities were able to mount a comeback after a soft open with positive economic reports coming from Wall Street. Traders are also still keeping in the back of their mind a fifth round of stimulus has to be coming sooner rather than later from the US Government. So Tuesday's gains will pair nicely with Monday when equities were able to pull higher across the world. PMI (purchasing managers index) data from Europe and China came out strong and above analyst expectations. The data continues to support economic expansion amid the pandemic. In the currencies turn around Tuesday went against the US Dollar and turned early gains into light losses by the afternoon closing session. As the US Dollar continues it's decline that is helping strengthen the Chinese Yuan. For the last 8+ months the Yuan has been holding near an all time low against the US Dollar of 7 yuan to 1 US dollar. It has now moved to 6.95 yuan to 1 US Dollar. Some analyst are targeting the Yuan to move to at least 6.85 yuan to 1 US Dollar. This would weaken the buying power of the US Dollar, but it would weaken the Chinese economy where they have used a continually devaluing Yuan to gain leverage in the global export market. Now that the US Dollar has seemingly been dethroned from the ultimate safe haven Gold is back and screaming higher. On Tuesday Gold crossed into record territory above $2,000/ounce. The good news as John Payne, Daniels Ag Marketing, pointed out in his afternoon commentary is that with gold acting inflationary it may eventfully spill over into the broader commodity sector. Looking at the grains that spill over could not come soon enough. A lower US Dollar is still attracting foreign grain buyers. USDA announced a flash sale on Monday of 260,000 MT of soybeans to unknown destinations . Many analysts assume unknown to be China. Tuesday the wire was quiet with no flash sales from USDA. Grain bulls were unimpressed with the latest crop condition ratings. Soybeans improved across the country to 73% good to excellent. Corn remained unchanged week to week at 72% good to excellent. XStone also released their findings from their most recent yield survey. Arlan Suderman of XStone says, "The customer survey pegged this year’s corn crop at 182.4 bushels per acre, while putting the soybean crop at 54.2 bushels per acre. Both would be records if verified. It should be mentioned that last year’s August survey perfectly predicted USDA’s final corn yield, although we recognize that August weather will continue to impact yield expectations, and we look forward to surveying our customers again September 1 to see how perceptions may be changing."  These two pieces of fundamental data in the trade sidelined all bulls and brought the bears out in full force. September corn fell through all levels of nearby support and may try a run at $3. Soybeans also looking be sinking back towards spring lows or even worse. Seasonally August is usually a tough month for grains, but 2020 is not being gentle. Livestock traded on both side of unchanged, but mostly lower on Tuesday. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, pointed out in his midday market commentary that feeder cattle were battling all sorts of technical resistance. One key area being an extremely wide corn feeder cattle spread. This could cause feeders to grind lower if the technical points cannot be beat. Cash cattle were higher last and this could help get them on the right foot. The latest CDC data shows that daily cases of Covid-19 are dropping and this could help get more people to dine out. Unfortunately that doesn't help in states that have closed dining rooms once again. Monday hog slaughter is on pace with a year ago, but significantly lower than a week ago. There is no major chatter that plants are shutting down again due to Covid-19. So this could mean that hogs are closer to being a current market levels. Cattle supplies also look to be more current with Nebraska fed cattle weights last week dropping 14 pounds to average 1358 lbs,  steer carcass dropped 3 pounds week to week to 899 lbs and heifer carcass weights went unchanged week to week at  829 lbs. On the live cattle front Tyson is reporting Monday that it is fully cooperating with the DOJ in their cattle price discrepancy investigation.  In a regulatory disclosure Tyson foods released information that they received a civil investigative demand from the DOJ antitrust division on May 22. It is believed all 4 of the major beef processors received the same notice. A light trade kicked off on Tuesday in Kansas at $100, $3 higher than last week's weighted average. Tuesday afternoon the rest of cattle country is very quiet. Asking prices are around $100 to $102 in the South, and $165 plus in the North. Expected Slaughter numbers Tuesday Cattle 119,000 hd today 117,000 hd wk ago 120,706 hd yr ago   Hogs 475,000 hd today 476,000  hd wk ago 474,097 hd yr ago     Midday Carcass Value Tuesday Beef Choice up 0.22 204.88 Select dn 0.15 190.25 C/S Spread 14.64 Loads 78 Pork Carcass dn 0.06 66.72 Bellies dn 4.61 100.85 Loads 272   Grain Settlements Corn dn 1 -9 1/4 Soybeans dn 5 1/4 - 14 1/2 Chicago Wht dn 5 1/4 - 12 3/4 Kansas City Wht dn 6- 8 1/2 Livestock Settlements  Live Cattle  dn 0.10 - 0.80 Feeder Cattle dn 0.45 up 0.15 Lean Hogs dn 0.75  up 0.62 Class III Milk dn 0.26 - 1.50 Pre-Opening Market Broker Commentary Mark Gold, Top Third Ag Marketing, discusses overnight grains and what the trade may see today. Crop conditions continue to hold strong and that doesn't help the grain bull. Jerry Stowell, Country Futures,  looks at what may impact the livestock futures today. Cattle will try to overcome technical resistance to move higher. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, takes a look at the midday trade. Crop conditions and yield forecasts have the bears front and center. John Payne, Daniel's Ag Marketing, takes a closer look at today's grain close. Grains don't look great at the moment, but there may be hope in the long run. Jack Fenske, York Commodities, looks at the closing market numbers.

The Monday Fontanelle Final Bell with Brad Kooima of Kooima, Kooima & Varilek

More bullish on cattle then in the past couple of weeks Cattle coming around Could be less cattle this fall then compared to previous years August 5, 2019 $107.80 not far off from where we are today Weeks…not months to getting caught up. Cash will grind higher the next couple of weeks Packers are willing to take on inventory. COVID & retail trade & exports are amazing. Hogs on the other hand struggle. Another gut punch to the trade Pork product not doing well, which makes the cash market struggle Export hogs are good, just need to get the short term to catch Grains-we will get another round of crop rating. We need to shift from supply to demand. Massive exports to China  

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Livestock

The Tuesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Mike Zuzolo of Global Commodity Analytics

Crop progress report Yield information that wasn’t a big surprise to the trade Collusion in grains? China buying more grain as they ramp up hog production Struggles in the cattle market    

AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Tuesday afternoon's close looks like equities got part of a turn around Tuesday, but agriculture commodities got the full bear. Equities were able to mount a comeback after a soft open with positive economic reports coming from Wall Street. Traders are also still keeping in the back of their mind a fifth round of stimulus has to be coming sooner rather than later from the US Government. So Tuesday's gains will pair nicely with Monday when equities were able to pull higher across the world. PMI (purchasing managers index) data from Europe and China came out strong and above analyst expectations. The data continues to support economic expansion amid the pandemic. In the currencies turn around Tuesday went against the US Dollar and turned early gains into light losses by the afternoon closing session. As the US Dollar continues it's decline that is helping strengthen the Chinese Yuan. For the last 8+ months the Yuan has been holding near an all time low against the US Dollar of 7 yuan to 1 US dollar. It has now moved to 6.95 yuan to 1 US Dollar. Some analyst are targeting the Yuan to move to at least 6.85 yuan to 1 US Dollar. This would weaken the buying power of the US Dollar, but it would weaken the Chinese economy where they have used a continually devaluing Yuan to gain leverage in the global export market. Now that the US Dollar has seemingly been dethroned from the ultimate safe haven Gold is back and screaming higher. On Tuesday Gold crossed into record territory above $2,000/ounce. The good news as John Payne, Daniels Ag Marketing, pointed out in his afternoon commentary is that with gold acting inflationary it may eventfully spill over into the broader commodity sector. Looking at the grains that spill over could not come soon enough. A lower US Dollar is still attracting foreign grain buyers. USDA announced a flash sale on Monday of 260,000 MT of soybeans to unknown destinations . Many analysts assume unknown to be China. Tuesday the wire was quiet with no flash sales from USDA. Grain bulls were unimpressed with the latest crop condition ratings. Soybeans improved across the country to 73% good to excellent. Corn remained unchanged week to week at 72% good to excellent. XStone also released their findings from their most recent yield survey. Arlan Suderman of XStone says, "The customer survey pegged this year’s corn crop at 182.4 bushels per acre, while putting the soybean crop at 54.2 bushels per acre. Both would be records if verified. It should be mentioned that last year’s August survey perfectly predicted USDA’s final corn yield, although we recognize that August weather will continue to impact yield expectations, and we look forward to surveying our customers again September 1 to see how perceptions may be changing."  These two pieces of fundamental data in the trade sidelined all bulls and brought the bears out in full force. September corn fell through all levels of nearby support and may try a run at $3. Soybeans also looking be sinking back towards spring lows or even worse. Seasonally August is usually a tough month for grains, but 2020 is not being gentle. Livestock traded on both side of unchanged, but mostly lower on Tuesday. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, pointed out in his midday market commentary that feeder cattle were battling all sorts of technical resistance. One key area being an extremely wide corn feeder cattle spread. This could cause feeders to grind lower if the technical points cannot be beat. Cash cattle were higher last and this could help get them on the right foot. The latest CDC data shows that daily cases of Covid-19 are dropping and this could help get more people to dine out. Unfortunately that doesn't help in states that have closed dining rooms once again. Monday hog slaughter is on pace with a year ago, but significantly lower than a week ago. There is no major chatter that plants are shutting down again due to Covid-19. So this could mean that hogs are closer to being a current market levels. Cattle supplies also look to be more current with Nebraska fed cattle weights last week dropping 14 pounds to average 1358 lbs,  steer carcass dropped 3 pounds week to week to 899 lbs and heifer carcass weights went unchanged week to week at  829 lbs. On the live cattle front Tyson is reporting Monday that it is fully cooperating with the DOJ in their cattle price discrepancy investigation.  In a regulatory disclosure Tyson foods released information that they received a civil investigative demand from the DOJ antitrust division on May 22. It is believed all 4 of the major beef processors received the same notice. A light trade kicked off on Tuesday in Kansas at $100, $3 higher than last week's weighted average. Tuesday afternoon the rest of cattle country is very quiet. Asking prices are around $100 to $102 in the South, and $165 plus in the North. Expected Slaughter numbers Tuesday Cattle 119,000 hd today 117,000 hd wk ago 120,706 hd yr ago   Hogs 475,000 hd today 476,000  hd wk ago 474,097 hd yr ago     Midday Carcass Value Tuesday Beef Choice up 0.22 204.88 Select dn 0.15 190.25 C/S Spread 14.64 Loads 78 Pork Carcass dn 0.06 66.72 Bellies dn 4.61 100.85 Loads 272   Grain Settlements Corn dn 1 -9 1/4 Soybeans dn 5 1/4 - 14 1/2 Chicago Wht dn 5 1/4 - 12 3/4 Kansas City Wht dn 6- 8 1/2 Livestock Settlements  Live Cattle  dn 0.10 - 0.80 Feeder Cattle dn 0.45 up 0.15 Lean Hogs dn 0.75  up 0.62 Class III Milk dn 0.26 - 1.50 Pre-Opening Market Broker Commentary Mark Gold, Top Third Ag Marketing, discusses overnight grains and what the trade may see today. Crop conditions continue to hold strong and that doesn't help the grain bull. Jerry Stowell, Country Futures,  looks at what may impact the livestock futures today. Cattle will try to overcome technical resistance to move higher. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, takes a look at the midday trade. Crop conditions and yield forecasts have the bears front and center. John Payne, Daniel's Ag Marketing, takes a closer look at today's grain close. Grains don't look great at the moment, but there may be hope in the long run. Jack Fenske, York Commodities, looks at the closing market numbers.

Nebraska Extension to host Calf Health Management on Arrival webinar series

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension will host the 2020 Calf  Health Management on Arrival webinar series. The webinars will take place weekly beginning on Aug. 18. The Calf Health Management on Arrival webinar series is designed to highlight management strategies relative to biocontainment, stress mitigation, nutrition, and treatment options that will set calves up for success. Each session will feature a presentation from an industry expert and a segment featuring a veterinarian or producer perspective. Each webinar will begin at 12:30 p.m. Central time. Dates are Aug. 18, Aug. 25, Sept. 1 and Sept. 8. Topics and speakers are as follows: August 18, Biocontainment Systems approach to maintaining health in high-risk calves, Dr. John Groves, DVM, Livestock Veterinary Service, Eldon, Mo. Penning order and morbidity outcomes, veterinarian/producer perspective August 25, Stress mitigation Arrival health programs for high-risk calves, Dr. Dan Thomson, animal science department head, Iowa State University Handling procedures that reduce arrival stress and promote health, veterinarian/producer perspective September 1, Nutrition Role of nutrition in health maintenance of calves, Dr. Clint Krehbiel, animal science department head, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Feeding programs on arrival, veterinarian/producer perspective September 8, Treatment options Limitations of remote drug delivery devices (dart guns) for cattle health management, Dr. Brian Vander Ley, DVM, Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center, Clay Center, Neb. Beef quality assurance, veterinarian/producer perspective “Management of nutrition and health for calves on arrival is one of the most important decisions for ensuring positive outcomes for beef production,” said Clint Krehbiel, UNL animal science department head. “Participants will learn from scientists who are passionate about their success and the health and well-being of beef cattle.” Those who are interested in registering for one or more webinar sessions may do so online at rb.gy/avsfqo. There is no cost to participate in this webinar series.

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Technology

Nebraska FFA Foundation seeks donations for 2020 jacket program

The Nebraska FFA Foundation is now accepting donations for the 2020 Blue Jackets. Bright Futures program. Through the program, the foundation provides FFA members with a free FFA jacket and tie or scarf. Students must complete an application, which includes an advisor statement, and are selected from a committee of donors, supporters and other friends of the FFA. The program is designed to help students begin their journey in the FFA to support their own personal development, the advancement of agriculture, and their local communities.  The Nebraska FFA Foundation urges those who have worn a blue jacket, or simply believe in what the jacket stands for, to step up and gift the iconic blue corduroy to a deserving high school student.  “I really do appeal to folks if they have never donated to this before, it is $100 that goes to great use,” said Stacey Agnew, executive director of the Nebraska FFA Foundation. “Please consider doing this. We definitely could use the help!”  This year, the Nebraska FFA Foundation has a goal of giving out 250 jackets. The number of jackets given out relies directly on the number of donations received.  Donations can be made for $100 per student and must be received by September 1 for the jacket to be given out this school year. Learn more and donate: https://neffafoundation.org/blue-jackets-bright-futures/page.html  

Prepping for an ag career

CURTIS, Neb. – Toward the end of August, Allison Wilkens and Logan Wamsley will move into college residence halls at Curtis as college freshmen. However, the pair of diversified agriculture majors are not rookies in a Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture classroom. High school transcripts will show each has logged six hours of college credits from NCTA in dual credit courses. Allison took crop science the fall semester of her freshmen year at Gibbon High School, followed by a natural resource class the next spring. She also chalked up credits from other colleges in general education and agriculture so is transferring a total of 12 hours to NCTA. “I figured, why not get a head start during high school,” she says. Her NCTA emphasis in diversified ag (crops, livestock, ag mechanics) will include agribusiness management and the Aggie Crops Judging Team. Logan studied crop science and beef production during independent study, dual credit courses while at Sidney High School. He, too, will major in NCTA’s diversified ag program and add a certificate in irrigation technology. “The online class was different from a high school class in that I could take it when I wanted,” Logan says. “I tried to work on it every day some, and since it wasn’t at a set time that gave me more flexibility.” Dual credits and transfer students are welcomed at NCTA. Our faculty and staff are always ready to advise and discuss how an individual’s initial college investment can be parlayed into a completed degree or certificate. During this time of the coronavirus pandemic, we are seeing more students turning to the Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture as transfer students. Some want to have a smaller campus population with smaller class sizes. Others find the hands-on learning and outdoor settings appealing for their classes and opportunities with our Aggie competition teams. Dual credit advantage   Dr. Brad Ramsdale, chair of the NCTA Agronomy and Agricultural Mechanics Division, is the academic advisor for both Allison and Logan. He teaches three of the nine dual credit classes offered through NCTA – Agricultural Careers, Crop Science, and Natural Resources Management. “Over the years, I’ve seen my dual credit courses as a great service for home-schooled students and those without high school agriculture programs,” says Professor Ramsdale. “The NCTA courses provide all students a great opportunity to obtain foundational agricultural knowledge.” Details and registration can be found at https://go.unl.edu/yfhs. Nine courses are offered this fall which include a radiology class through veterinary technology, two in agribusiness, and three each in animal science and agronomy. They also are planned for the spring semester, and are listed at https://go.unl.edu/w765. Registration for dual credit is requested by August 28. We begin on-campus, in-person classes on August 24 so inquiries are encouraged soon to avoid last-minute delays and start up. Tuition is an affordable $69.50 per credit hour for high school juniors and seniors. Summer Exams, Welcome Aggies Our summer session of eight weeks has flown by! Finals are this week, concluding by Friday and then a short break before the Fall Session begins on August 24. This year, the New Student Orientation will be provided online for freshmen and transfer students. Details for NSO and move-in periods for the residence halls will be announced soon. For fall registration, course offerings, financial aid and enrollment details for the fall semester, contact Gaylene in our Student Services department at 308-367-5267. We want to hear from you! Horses on Friday The final NCTA Summer Horsemanship Clinic is Friday, here at the indoor arena of the Livestock Teaching Center. The morning session focuses on advanced riding and after lunch the riders will work with the mechanical cow. For cost and times, call the animal science department at 308-367-5291. The instructor is Joanna Hergenreder, animal science professor and Ranch Horse Team coach. I look forward to greeting and meeting our future in agriculture with the NCTA Aggie classes of ’21 and ’22!

USDA funds technology research for optimum production from better, smarter planting

MANHATTAN — In a collaborative effort with crop producers, researchers at Kansas State University will introduce the latest technologies for precision planters to help enhance productivity and maximize yield. With nearly $300,000 in funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Research Education and Economics — National Institute of Food and Agriculture program, a team led by Ajay Sharda, associate professor in the Carl and Melinda Helwig Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, will pursue "Enhancing Crop Productivity by Developing Operational Strategies for High-Speed Precision Seeding Technologies." The three-year project involves conducting on-farm studies in collaboration with producers to better understand planter control system dynamics during high-speed planting. This will be observed under varying seeding rates, row spacing, planting depths, tillage systems, and weather and soil types. "We will establish recommendations for producers to smartly implement machine operating parameters to achieve uniform emergence. This in turn will improve stand establishment, early-season growth and yield optimization on a row-by-row basis," said Sharda, a Carl and Mary Ice Keystone research scholar in the Carl R. Ice College of Engineering at K-State. On-farm research with producers as partners will provide a metric to assess the advantages of adopting precision planter technologies — not only from the machinery but also from the agronomic perspective with the ultimate goal of improving overall productivity and profitability. "This will develop strong extension and applied research programs for disseminating this material," Sharda said. "It will showcase best management practices for optimizing current precision planter technologies to achieve uniform seed placement and gain yield advantages." The project will require Sharda and K-State co-collaborators Ignacio Ciampitti, agronomy, and Edwin Brokesh, biological and agricultural engineering, to adopt novel methodologies and robust high-frequency data acquisition systems for gathering detailed machinery and agronomic data. "Collecting this multiyear, large scale on-farm research data," Sharda said, "will not only allow our students to work with state-of-the-art technologies for their professional development, but will also enhance K-State's research capacity to engage with numerous research partners to conduct collaborative large-scale on-farm research." Engagement and support will also be provided by Kansas extension agents Tony Whitehair, Dickinson County, and David Hallauer, Meadowlark Extension District.

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Ag Policy

House Ag Appropriations chair may have misused campaign funds

A report by the Office of Congressional Ethics says Representative Sanford Bishop, a Georgia Democrat, may have misused campaign funds. Bishop is Chairman of the House Agriculture Appropriations Committee, and has served as the Representative for Georgia’s 2nd congressional district, encompassing Southwest Georgia, since 1993. The ethics report released last week says Bishop's campaign committee, Sanford Bishop for Congress, reported campaign disbursements that may not be legitimate and verifiable campaign expenditures. The report recommends further review, because “there is substantial reason to believe” Bishop converted campaign funds for personal use. The report includes evidence of thousands of dollars invoiced to Bishop from a Georgia golf course, along with credit card statements, including travel and golf-related charges. Bishop also serves on the Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee and is Vice Chair on the Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Subcommittee. In a statement, Bishop’s office says he “has fully cooperated” with the review and proactively reimbursed many of the charges identified as incorrect.

Perdue says EU “Green Deal” could undermine trade talks with the U.S.

USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue says the European Union’s recently-published EU “Green Deal” strategies could “undermine trade and affect the viability of EU farmers.” Perdue’s claim was immediately refuted by his EU counterpart. Euractive.com says Perdue spoke during a webinar on the transatlantic perspective on food security in a post-COVID world last week. Perdue commended the EU for focusing on sustainability and expressed a strong desire to work with the European Union. However, he criticized the new food policy, which he says, “seems to have forgotten the ‘farm’ in ‘Farm to Fork.’” The EU says the new Farm to Fork policy is intended to improve the sustainability of agriculture within the bloc and shorten the distance between the farm and the end-user. Together with the new biodiversity plan, those two policies make up the heart of the EU Green Deal. Perdue also says EU farmers were being left without the tools they need to do their jobs, warning that it could make farmers there uncompetitive. If that happens, it could then lead to EU protectionism, something that could “do some real damage to the global trade environment.” However, the EU Ag Commissioner says the emphasis on reinforcing shorter supply chains doesn’t imply any new trade barriers, adding that the bloc “isn’t against and needs international trade.”

NASDA: Senate Coronavirus Aid Falls Short for Agriculture

Negotiations to finalize the next coronavirus relief package in Congress are far from the finish line, and so is aid for agriculture, according to the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. The Senate Republican proposal includes a second round of $1,200 stimulus payments for individuals, extends additional unemployment payments by $200 a week through September, and includes substantial funding for schools and COVID-19 testing, and $20 billion for agriculture. The discretionary funding would support agricultural producers, growers and processors. Not included in the Republican plan is additional funding for food and nutrition programs or dedicated funding for state departments of agriculture to respond to COVID-19 impacts. NASDA CEO Barb Glenn says, “This relief package falls short of meeting the needs of the food and agriculture community.” Further, Debbie Stabenow, a Michigan Democrat and ranking member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, says, “Struggling Americans deserve better.” Stabenow says the Republican plan is “a non-starter” without nutrition assistance included.

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Markets

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