class="home blog group-blog masthead-fixed list-view full-width grid wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2 vc_responsive"
Rural Radio Network | Affiliates Rural Radio Network site

Rural Radio Network

El Nino Conditions Forecast for Fall-Winter

Al Dutcher - Associate Nebraska State Climatologist Longer term forecasts of what lies ahead for the Central Plains this fall and winter often start with a look at ocean temperature trends. Sea surface conditions in the Equatorial Pacific continue to exhibit above normal temperatures, with a l...

Read More
story slider pointer

El Nino Conditions Forecast for Fall-Winter

Al Dutcher - Associate Nebraska State Climatologist Longer term forecasts of what lies ahead for the Central Plains this fall and winter often start with a look at ocean temperature trends. Sea surface conditions in the Equatorial Pacific continue to exhibit above normal temperatures, with a l...

Read More

(Audio) "Chat with the Chancellor" with Special Guest, NCTA Dean, Dr. Ron Rosati

Brandon Benitz continues his weekly “Chat with the Chancellor” series here in the Fall 2018 semester, once again joined by a special guest, Dr. Ron Rosati, the Dean of the campus of the Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture in Curtis. This month, we talk about the great numbers coming out...

Read More

U.S., Korea Expected to Sign Revised Trade Deal

President Trump this week announced that the United States and South Korea soon will sign the revised free trade agreement between the countries. The agreement, which was finalized earlier this year, could be signed as early as Sept. 25, during the United Nations General Assembly meeting, according...

Read More

Cattle on Feed Report *AUDIO*

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.1 million head on September 1, 2018. The inventory was 6 percent above September 1, 2017, USDA reported Friday. Listen to Jerry Stowell of Country Futures break down...

Read More

Nebraska State Fair releases audited attendance figures

Grand Island, NE—Nebraska State Fair today announced audited results for the recent 2018 Fair held in Grand Island, NE August 24-September 3. Lori Cox, executive director for the State Fair, said: “Although it takes a bit of additional time to get the Fair’s results tallied and verified by ...

Read More

Crops

Elevator Manager Under Investigation After Millions Go Missing From Grain Cooperative

Roughly 150 farmers attended a meeting Tuesday night in Ashby, Minnesota, looking for answers about the closed Ashby Farmers Cooperative Elevator and its former manager, who allegedly stole at least $2 million from the elevator before disappearing earlier this month. An audit of the grain cooperative's books is continuing to detail actual losses, and investigators are looking into the alleged fraud by former elevator manager Jerry Hennessey. He had managed the elevator since 1989, but has not been seen in Ashby since it became clear the elevator was missing funds. Erik Ahlgren, an attorney hired to sort through the losses and find a possible buyer for the 307,000-bushel-capacity grain elevator, said roughly half the people in the crowd raised their hands when he asked how many farmers were still owed money from the cooperative. Minnesota requires bonding, but the bond for the cooperative is valued at $125,000. Farmers can file claims with the state, but officials won't know the exact total of claims filed and possible payout per farmer until at least six months from now. The pool of claims is determined, then divided pro rata among all of those who file, Ahlgren said. Insurance on the elevator for crimes is $100,000 per loss. That raises questions of how single losses are defined and whether that will cover a larger amount. In a statement to farmers announcing the closure, Ahlgren stated the co-op board did not expect to have funds to pay the co-op's outstanding obligations. Beyond what is owed to farmers, the Ashby Farmers Cooperative also owes $8 million to the Farm Credit lender CoBank. The cooperative has about 300 members who are defined as having at least $500 in transactions with the elevator over the last year. The elevator stopped taking deliveries on Sept. 10 and effectively shut down Sept. 14. Ahlgren, whose office is in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, was brought in to deal with the aftermath and find a new owner. He said the cooperative board began immediately looking for new owners and told DTN on Thursday at least one company would submit a bid before the end of the day. At least two other grain businesses were also weighing bids for the elevator. "I hope to at least get a deal structured where we could get the elevator up and running, possibly in the next week or two weeks," Ahlgren said. "That would require us to do an interim lease, but we are open to doing an interim lease. I understand the bank would be supportive of us doing an interim lease. That would be a way for us to get it up and running while we are completing a sale." The initial investigation showed at least $2 million in unauthorized checks signed by Hennessey, which included more than $1 million paid on a personal Cabela's Visa card, more than $500,000 for taxidermy services and $375,000 for safari hunting trips. Hennessey is a big-game hunter and was out of the country most of August on a safari trip. DTN could not reach Hennessey for comment. Ahlgren said that once the full reckoning of lost assets is known, as well as how much is owed to farmers, civil cases will likely be brought to go after Hennessey's personal assets. Since the situation with missing money became clear, Hennessey has disappeared from the Ashby area. A criminal investigation has been opened by the Grant County (Minnesota) Sheriff's Office, and the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension has been brought in as well. Last April, when the co-op held its annual meeting, sales for the prior year were reported $14,565,516. The grain bushel handle was reported at $2,852,553, local profits were $238,977 and total net profits after regional patronage refunds were $335,812, according to the report in the Battle Lake, (Minnesota) Review. All of those numbers are now suspect.

Safety Professionals Gear Up for Training in Kearney

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA – Safety professionals from across the state will gather in Kearney, Nebraska, for the 14th annual Environment, Health and Safety Summit Friday, September 28. The daylong summit presented by the Nebraska Ethanol Board will feature speakers from agencies and organizations across the country, including the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, Air Regulations Consultants, NAQS Environmental Experts and Pinnacle Engineering. “This is a great opportunity to network and learn about the latest regulations and compliance changes, especially as ethanol plants implement new technology and expand operations,” said Megan Grimes, Nebraska Ethanol Board program manager. “We are proud that the summit is attracting companies both directly and indirectly related to the ethanol industry, including organizations that focus on air quality and environmental compliance.” To organize and put on the summit, the Nebraska Ethanol Board works with a variety of private partners and ethanol plant personnel that focus on compliance, worker safety and public health issues. College students are invited to attend and may qualify for a scholarship to waive the registration fee. The event is presented in cooperation with Renewable Fuels Nebraska and the Nebraska Ethanol Industry Coalition, and is open to professionals who work in environmental compliance, worker safety, and processing and manufacturing. For registration details, contact the Nebraska Ethanol Board at 402-471-2941 or visit www.ethanol.nebraska.gov/wordpress/events/ehs-summit/.

(Video) Headline Stories in Agriculture - Friday Five

Bryce Doeschot and Alex Voichoskie recap agriculture news from the past week in the latest edition of Friday Five, presented by the Nebraska Corn Board. This week, learn more about a music festival that raised money for farmers and ranchers during the 1980s, a new health plan for Nebraska Farm Bureau members, and another day of celebration we encourage everybody to take part in! 5) Harvest is Underway 4) Farm Aid III Fills Memorial Stadium 3) China Sets More Tariffs on U.S. Food and Ag Exports 2) NE Farm Bureau Aims to Lower Health Costs for Farmers, Ranchers 1) National Cheeseburger Day!

View All

Livestock

Sept 21 Cattle on Feed - State Break-down

NEBRASKA CATTLE ON FEED UP 8 PERCENT Nebraska feedlots, with capacities of 1,000 or more head, contained 2.33 million cattle on feed on September 1, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. This inventory was up 8 percent from last year. Placements during August totaled 480,000 head, up 2 percent from 2017. Fed cattle marketings for the month of August totaled 470,000 head, unchanged from last year. Other disappearance during August totaled 10,000 head, unchanged from last year.   United States Cattle on Feed Up 6 Percent Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.1 million head on September 1, 2018. The inventory was 6 percent above September 1, 2017. This is the highest September 1 inventory since the series began in 1996. Cattle on Feed - By State                                   (1,000 hd   -   % Sept 1, '17) Colorado .......:             900                105 Iowa ................:             680                106 Kansas ...........:            2,310                104 Nebraska ......:            2,330                108 Texas ..............:            2,680                103 Placements in feedlots during August totaled 2.07 million head, 7 percent above 2017. Net placements were 2.02 million head. During August, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 430,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 335,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 460,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 475,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 240,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 130,000 head. Placements by State                                  (1,000 hd   -   % Aug, '17) Colorado .......:            205          117 Iowa ................:              82            89 Kansas .............:          520           105 Nebraska .......:           480           102 Texas ...............:           415           108 Marketings of fed cattle during August totaled 1.98 million head, slightly above 2017. Other disappearance totaled 55,000 head during August, 12 percent above 2017. Marketings by State                                (1,000 hd - % Aug, '17) Colorado .......:          190            100 Iowa ................:          100             99 Kansas ...........:           430            97 Nebraska ......:           470           100 Texas ..............:           440            101    

Cattle on Feed Report *AUDIO*

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.1 million head on September 1, 2018. The inventory was 6 percent above September 1, 2017, USDA reported Friday. Listen to Jerry Stowell of Country Futures break down the report: http://bit.ly/2OP2uPO This is the highest September 1 inventory since the series began in 1996. Placements in feedlots during August totaled 2.07 million head, 7 percent above 2017. Net placements were 2.02 million head. During August, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 430,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 335,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 460,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 475,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 240,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 130,000 head. Marketings of fed cattle during August totaled 1.98 million head, slightly above 2017. Other disappearance totaled 55,000 head during August, 12 percent above 2017. To view the full Cattle on Feed report, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/… USDA Actual Average Guess Range Cattle on Feed: On Feed Sept. 1 106.0% 105.3% 104.2-105.9% Placed in August 107.0% 104.0% 101.1-107.0% Marketed in August 100.0% 100.1% 99.8-104.3%  

Livestock Losses Mounting after Florence

Recovery is underway in North Carolina after Hurricane Florence. The number of livestock lost to flooding is climbing in the aftermath. The North Carolina Ag Department says 5,500 hogs and 3.4 million poultry were lost due to the hurricane. In addition to damage on farms around the area, other reports included wind damage to hog farms, as well as substantial road damage. That makes for a lot of logistical challenges for farmers to get feed to their livestock, electricity on farms, and just getting to the barns successfully to care for their animals. Smithfield Foods said just one of their 200 company-owned farms in North Carolina had floodwaters inundate the hog houses and the lagoon. The NAFSmithfield processing plant in Tar Heel, North Carolina, is scheduled to ramp up production as roads become more passable. Sanderson Farms reported that 60 broiler houses and four feeder houses were all flooded. About 30 of the independent farms that supply Sanderson with birds are isolated by floodwaters and unreachable right now. That amounts to about 6 million birds that they can’t get feed too. Sanderson reports there was no damage to processing facilities, feed mill, or two hatcheries. Operations resumed at the feed mill on Monday and on Tuesday at the processing plant.

View All

Technology

Sen. Moran Advocates for Relocating USDA’s ERS and NIFA to Kansas

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) today urged U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue to consider Kansas as a relocation site for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Economic Research Service (ERS) and National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). In August, USDA announced the department’s decision to move ERS and NIFA out of Washington, D.C. and closer to stakeholders and qualified staff.    “Kansas is home to a highly-skilled workforce as a result of the state’s premier universities, research institutions, agricultural companies, and industry producer groups,”wrote Sen. Moran. “The animal health corridor, stretching from Manhattan, Kansas to Columbia, Missouri, is the largest concentration of animal health companies in the world. As of 2014, 56 percent of the worldwide animal health, diagnostics and pet food sales were located within the corridor.”  “Manhattan, Kansas is also the future home of the National Bio and Agro-defense Facility (NBAF), the nation’s foremost animal disease research facility,” continued Sen. Moran. “The concentration of animal health companies and location of NBAF will not only complement the research capabilities of NIFA and ERS, but have also fostered a talented workforce that will help meet the personnel needs of USDA.”  The full text of the letter is below and available here.

Nebraska to Receive Nearly $7 Million for Water Infrastructure

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced that Nebraska will receive nearly $7 million of investment in water and wastewater infrastructure. U.S. Senator Deb Fischer (R-Neb.), a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee and the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, released the following statement: “I’m happy to hear the USDA is investing nearly $7 million in water and wastewater infrastructure in rural Nebraska. The communities of Ainsworth, Alexandria, Wauneta, and Western will see big improvements and upgrades to their systems. These major investments will keep Nebraskans healthy and safe.”   More information from the USDA on how the investment will be used in Nebraska: Ainsworth, Neb. will use a $1.27 million loan and $453,000 grant to reconstruct sewage lift stations and provide backup power to lift stations by installing generators. New radio read meters will be installed. Also, pipe linings will be upgraded, providing better service to more than 880 users. The village of Alexandria, Neb. will use a $332,000 loan and a $357,000 grant to add an additional well to the water system and increase the size of water distribution main lines. The improvements will add both safety and efficiency to the water system for the village's 76 residents. The project was funded after completion of a report paid for with a $30,000 Rural Development Special Evaluation Assistance for Rural Communities and Households Grant. The village of Wauneta, Neb. will use a $1.48 million loan and a $1.55 million grant to construct two wells with well houses to provide safe drinking water to 356 users. These new wells will replace two older wells. A 50,000-gallon ground storage tank will be constructed and an emergency backup generator will also be installed. Radio read meters will replace the existing meters. The village of Western, Neb. will use a $1.03 million loan and a $463,000 grant to replace a sewage treatment facility with a land application lagoon system. Additional funding includes a $24,000 Rural Development Special Evaluation Assistance for Rural Communities and Households grant awarded in FY 2016.

Plan now to avert wheat stem rust threat

MANHATTAN, Kan. — If you’ve attended a K-State Research and Extension wheat plot tour in the last few years, you might remember the K-State Specialist mentioning the dangers of stem rust and the increasing use of susceptible varieties. Although the disease has been well controlled lately, stem rust is a potential threat every year. The 2018 Kansas Wheat Varieties USDA NASS report shows 30 percent of the wheat acres in western Kansas were planted with susceptible varieties like T158, Byrd, Winterhawk and TAM 114. Just 10 years ago it was rare to find any varieties without the resistance. Although the disease has been out of sight for a number of years, it should not be ‘out of mind.’ During the 1980’s and 1990’s, it was not uncommon to see the disease plaguing fields, and in 1986, wheat farmers saw the most devastating yield loss from stem rust since the early 1960’s. Since then, the control of stem rust has remained fairly consistent due to farmers planting wheat varieties with genetic resistance. Dr. Robert Bowden, supervisory research plant pathologist with the USDA, said, “Currently, it is uncommon to see stem rust. This is a sign of our success in suppressing stem rust, primarily by using resistant varieties.” According to Bowden, there are three main risks from planting wheats that are susceptible to stem rust. “First, stem rust can cause direct yield and quality losses in fields of susceptible varieties. Second, rust spores can spread to other farmers’ fields in the local area and beyond. Third, susceptible varieties allow the pathogen population size to increase dramatically,” Bowden said. Raising the pathogen population size raises the probability that new races of the fungus will arise by mutation that could overcome existing resistance genes. “We only have a few good, effective resistance genes and so we can’t afford for them to be defeated by new races,” Bowden said. Although the impact of stem rust has diminished over the last 20 years, its damaging consequences make it hard to ignore the potential risks it poses. Farmers need to make sure they’re taking the right precautions to limit the chances of possible devastating yield loss from the disease. “In Kansas, we are currently benefitting from the fact that most Texas wheat farmers are avoiding stem rust-susceptible varieties, and thus not sending us stem rust spore showers every spring on southerly winds. We need to keep up our side of the deal. I would encourage farmers to avoid susceptible varieties unless they have a pre-planned fungicide application lined up,” Bowden said. Daryl Strouts, Kansas Wheat Alliance CEO, says some easy choices for growers to plant include KWA’s K-State wheat varieties Joe, a hard white winter wheat and Oakley CL, a hard red winter wheat. Both provide resistance to stem rust while also addressing the wheat streak mosaic virus issue present in western Kansas. “We’ve all seen the damage a disease like Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus can cause,” Strouts said. “Stem rust can be just as damaging and attacks just a few weeks before harvest. There’s so many great wheat varieties to choose from with good stem rust resistance, farmers should avoid those that are susceptible.” Strouts also notes KWA’s Larry, Tatanka and KanMark would also fit well into operations not willing to risk a stem rust outbreak as they all have resistance. By planting varieties with resistance, we can lower the concern of an outbreak possibility in Kansas. Do not let the forgotten scourge of wheat gain a foothold by planting susceptible wheat varieties. To learn more about K-State’s stem rust-resistant varieties, visit KWA’s website at http://kswheatalliance.org/ where you can learn about variety performance and where to buy.

View All

Ag Policy

Smith Awarded “High Octane Champion” Award from Nebraska’s Ethanol Industry

Congressman Adrian Smith (R-NE) has been recognized as a 2018 High Octane Champion by Renewable Fuels Nebraska, the trade association for Nebraska’s ethanol industry. The award was developed by the RFN membership as a way to recognize public policy leaders that strongly support Nebraska’s $5 billion ethanol industry. “Nebraska’s ethanol industry is proud to recognize Adrian Smith as a biofuels leader in the US House of Representatives and as one of this country’s stalwart supporters of the ethanol industry,” said RFN Executive Director Troy Bredenkamp. “At a time when Washington’s political climate for ethanol remains a challenge at best, Representative Smith continues to be a leader in the House on our behalf. This award is a small token of our appreciation and a way to recognize him for all that he does for us.” Smith has led the legislative effort in the US House to resolve the Reid vapor pressure (RVP) waiver issue and allow for year-around E15 sales nationwide. This week, the bi-partisan House Bio-fuels Caucus sent a letter to Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler urging the agency to act swiftly on E15 regulatory reform and Representative Smith was a leader in this effort. If the EPA fails to initiate the rule-making process on the RVP waiver, then there is a high likelihood that the US ethanol industry and consumers will once again see restricted E15 availability for the 2019 summer driving season. “Knowing how important year-around E15 sales would be to grow the US ethanol industry, Representative Smith introduced legislation that, if passed, would resolve the RVP waiver issue and force the EPA to allow for uninterrupted sales of E15 year around,” said Bredenkamp. “It is this kind of support that needs to be recognized and Nebraska’s ethanol producers want Representative Smith to know we appreciate everything he has done, and continues to do, on behalf of Nebraska and America’s ethanol industry.”

Congress needs to extend farm bill by Sept. 30

LYONS, NEBRASKA – Congress has 10 days to act before the 2014 farm bill expires. In response, Center for Rural Affairs Policy Associate Cora Fox said failing to pass a new farm bill or extend the current farm bill lets down farmers and ranchers. She said at this point, passage of a 2018 farm bill before the Sept. 30 deadline seems unlikely. “In the absence of a new farm bill, it is imperative that lawmakers extend current legislation,” Fox said. “Farmers and ranchers across the country rely on important programs that will sunset without an extension of the 2014 farm bill.” If Congress allows the current farm bill to expire, more than $1 billion in available federal funding will be inaccessible, including support for beginning farmers, veterans, conservation, local food production, and more. “Ignorance might be bliss for lawmakers in D.C. – far removed from the producers who are struggling to make ends meet,” Fox said. “Congress must act responsibly, set aside differences, and recognize that an extension will give producers the stability they need while farm bill negotiations continue.”

Canada Farmers Say Dairy Not a Bargaining Chip in Negotiations

Talks between Canada and the U.S. regarding the North American Free Trade Agreement are intensifying in Washington, D.C. Bloomberg says Canadian dairy farmers recently told Prime Minister Justin Trudeau not to use access to the protected Canadian dairy market as a bargaining chip. The Dairy Farmers of Canada says it’s already lost $193 million because of past trade agreements and they won’t accept more losses. “The work of our lives seems to have been reduced to a bargaining chip,” says Dairy Farmers of Canada president Pierre Lampron. The group, along with the Dairy Producers of Manitoba, says farmers will hold Trudeau accountable for his promise to defend the supply-management system. The threat may have added strength because of Canadian national elections which come in about a year. They say Canada’s market is too small to accommodate U.S. overproduction, saying the Class Seven milk targeted by President Donald Trump is worth protecting. Both groups issued a statement saying, “We will hold our prime minister accountable for saying he will defend supply management and dairy in the NAFTA negotiations. We have articulated clearly that the support means no access will be given to the Canadian dairy market.”

View All

Markets

View More
KRVN
KNEB KTIC KAWL KXSP - Omaha KSID - Sidney KCSR - Chadron KNCY - Nebraska City KWBE - Beatrice/Fairbury