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KAAPA Ethanol Holdings, Llc Closes On Purchase Of Ravenna Ethanol Plant

KAAPA Ethanol Holdings, LLC in Minden, Nebraska is pleased to announce that they have successfully closed on the purchase of the Abengoa Bioenergy ethanol facility in Ravenna, Nebraska for $115 million. The facility, now KAAPA Ethanol Ravenna LLC, will begin contracting corn directly from producers ...

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KAAPA Ethanol Holdings, Llc Closes On Purchase Of Ravenna Ethanol Plant

KAAPA Ethanol Holdings, LLC in Minden, Nebraska is pleased to announce that they have successfully closed on the purchase of the Abengoa Bioenergy ethanol facility in Ravenna, Nebraska for $115 million. The facility, now KAAPA Ethanol Ravenna LLC, will begin contracting corn directly from producers ...

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United States Hog Inventory Up 2 Percent , NE Up 9 and KS Up 2

United States inventory of all hogs and pigs on September 1, 2016 was 70.9 million head. This was up 2 percent from September 1, 2015, and up 4 percent from June 1, 2016. Breeding inventory, at 6.02 million head, was up 1 percent from last year, and up 1 percent from the previous quarter. Ma...

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Update to Packers and Stockyards Act Passes Congress

Congress voted to modernize the nearly 100-year-old Packers and Stockyards Act (P&S) on Thursday. The vote in the Senate took place just before Congress left on recess, a break that will last until after the elections in November. Introduced by Livestock and Foreign Agriculture Subcommittee Cha...

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Scouting for Stalk and Ear Rot Diseases

Stalk Rot Diseases Anthracnose stalk rot (with top dieback symptoms caused by the fungus Colletotrichum graminicola) has been especially common this year. The disease can cause the premature death of several internodes above the ear causing browning of the tops of the plant while the lower plant ma...

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USDA Reports Flash- Corn, Soybean Stocks Reflect Strong Fourth-Quarter Demand

WASHINGTON (DTN) -- Old-crop stocks for corn and soybeans came in just below the pre-report averages in USDA's end-of-marketing year for both crops. Corn came in at 1.738 billion bushels while soybean stocks came in at 197 million bushels. Quarterly wheat stocks, however, came in near the high ran...

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Crops

KAAPA Ethanol Holdings, Llc Closes On Purchase Of Ravenna Ethanol Plant

KAAPA Ethanol Holdings, LLC in Minden, Nebraska is pleased to announce that they have successfully closed on the purchase of the Abengoa Bioenergy ethanol facility in Ravenna, Nebraska for $115 million. The facility, now KAAPA Ethanol Ravenna LLC, will begin contracting corn directly from producers today, September 30. Chuck Woodside, CEO of KAAPA Ethanol, said, “We’re excited about the opportunities that are created through the purchase of the Ravenna facility. It is a plant in a great location with great logistics and its proximity to our Minden facility will give us the opportunity for additional synergies.” KAAPA Ethanol Ravenna is the first wholly owned ethanol acquisition for the organization. Since inception, they have worked collaboratively with other farmer owned ethanol plants across the Midwest in acquisitions and in ethanol marketing through Renewable Products Marketing Group, currently the third largest ethanol marketer in the United States. KAAPA Ethanol, LLC also owns KAAPA Grains in Elm Creek, NE along with partial ownership of three ethanol plants in North Dakota, Minnesota, and Ohio. Mitch Feldman, will join KAAPA Ethanol as Plant Manager, and will have operational responsibility for the Ravenna facility. KAAPA Ethanol has offered jobs to all Abengoa employees who were working at the plant just prior to the acquisition.. The purchase of the Ravenna plant increases KAAPA Ethanol, capacity ownership to over 300 million gallons annually.

Scouting for Stalk and Ear Rot Diseases

Stalk Rot Diseases Anthracnose stalk rot (with top dieback symptoms caused by the fungus Colletotrichum graminicola) has been especially common this year. The disease can cause the premature death of several internodes above the ear causing browning of the tops of the plant while the lower plant may still be green. During late season, the tops of the plants may also break off. Black lesions may develop at the nodes initially and spread to the lower internodes later in the season (Figure 2). The black discoloration is the pigmented fungal strands (hyphae) that may accumulate either on the outside or inside of the stalk as the fungus systemically colonizes the stalk. Although the fungus can also cause a leaf blight disease, it is not correlated well with later stalk rot development. The fungus may infect directly through the epidermis of the plant stalk or roots from infected buried debris or via wounds. Affected stalks often have the pith area rotted out, compromising the overall stalk strength. They may lodge or be easily crushed by hand and can be evaluated using the push or pinch tests while walking through the field. Resistant hybrids can be effective at reducing anthracnose stalk rot disease, although resistance to the leaf blight phase is not well correlated with resistance to the stalk rot phase of this disease. Most commercially available hybrids have some resistance and do not develop the disease until late season. Ear Rot Diseases Ear rot diseases are beginning to develop in some Nebraska fields and reportedly those in other states, as well. Corn fields should be scouted prior to harvest to assess ear rot disease, paying special attention to higher risk fields. Husks of affected ears may be discolored before other ears in the field or tip over early. Some fungal growth may only be evident after husks are opened on the ear to reveal a cottony fungal growth that can vary in color. Ear rot diseases are caused by several species of fungi that can continue to grow in stored grain, causing further loss of grain quality. In addition, some fungi may produce secondary mycotoxins that can be harmful at higher concentrations to livestock and other consumers. Ear rot diseases are more common in wounded ears, especially those damaged by ear-feeding insects or hail. In addition, some growing conditions, especially damp weather and cool temperatures during fall that slow grain drying, can favor fungal infection as well. Corn harvested from fields with widespread ear rot diseases should not be stored long term as fungi will continue to grow in storage and reduce grain quality. If affected grain must be stored, it should be cooled and dried quickly to less than 15% moisture to minimize mold growth. Grain bin fans should be used in storage bins to continue to move air through grain to equalize temperature throughout and prevent condensation development inside the bins that can also promote fungal growth. Currently, the most commonly observed ear rot disease appears to be Diplodia (Stenocarpella) ear rot. Infection is usually evident on the butt of the ear initially (Figure 3), but can spread across the entire ear thereafter giving it a lightweight feeling. The fungus can also produce small, black reproductive structures on kernels that are raised and may feel rough to touch and can often be scratched off. Although this fungus is not known to produce a mycotoxin, it can grow quickly and reduce grain quality, and will continue to grow in the bin.

USDA Reports Flash- Corn, Soybean Stocks Reflect Strong Fourth-Quarter Demand

WASHINGTON (DTN) -- Old-crop stocks for corn and soybeans came in just below the pre-report averages in USDA's end-of-marketing year for both crops. Corn came in at 1.738 billion bushels while soybean stocks came in at 197 million bushels. Quarterly wheat stocks, however, came in near the high range of pre-report estimates as USDA also revised several numbers from the 2015-16 production for different wheat classes. USDA's Grain Stocks estimates were neutral for corn and soybeans, but bearish for wheat, said DTN Analyst Todd Hultman. USDA's wheat production estimate was neutral for wheat prices, he said. For USDA's quarterly Grain Stocks and Small Grains Summary reports, visithttps://www.nass.usda.gov/… CORN Old-crop corn stocks on Sept. 1 totaled 1.738 billion bushels, coming in just under the pre-report average but well within the estimates offered by analysts. Of those stocks, USDA stated farms were storing 627 million bushels, up 6% from a year ago. Off-farm stocks were at 1.11 billion bushels, down 2% from a year ago. The June-August "disappearance" or usage was 2.97 billion bushels, up 8.4% from a year ago, reflecting strong demand for corn in the fourth quarter. SOYBEANS Old-crop soybeans in all positions on Sept. 1 totaled 197 million bushels, up 3% from a year ago. The soybean stocks were slightly below the average pre-report estimate, but well within range of the estimates offered. On-farm stocks totaled 41.6 million bushels, down 16% from a year. Off-farm stocks were pegged at 155 million bushels, up 10% from a year ago. The June-August usage was 657 million bushels, up 55% from a year ago. The high volume of usage reflected the poor soybean crop in South America and continued high demand for U.S. exports, especially in China. WHEAT All-wheat stored on Sept. 1 totaled 2.527 billion bushels, up 21% from a year ago. The old-crop wheat stocks were near the high end of the pre-report estimates. On-farm stocks were estimated at 726 million bushels, up 12% from last year. Off-farm stocks were pegged at 1.8 billion bushels, up 24% from a year ago. The June-August disappearance was 758 million bushels, up 6% from the time last year. All-wheat production totaled 2.31 billion bushels in 2016, up 12% from a revised 2015 total of 2.06 billion bushels. The average 2016 yield was pegged at 52.6 bushels per acre, a record high and up 9 bushels from 2015. Winter wheat production for 2016 totaled 1.67 billion bushels, up 22% from a revised 2015 total of 1.37 billion bushels. Hard-red winter wheat totaled 1.08 billion bushels, up 30% from last year due to that record yield. Soft-red winter production totaled 345 million bushels, down 4% from last year. Other spring wheat production for 2016 is estimated at 534 million bushels, down 11% from a revised 2015 total of 603 million bushels. Durum production for 2016 is estimated at 104 million bushels, up 24% from a revised 2015 total of 84 million bushels. SORGHUM Old-crop sorghum totaled 36.6 million bushels, up 99% from a year ago. On-farm stocks totaled 3.76 million bushels, up 98% from a year ago. Off-farm stocks were pegged at 32.9 million bushels, up 99% from last year. Still, production and demand for sorghum was reflected in that the June-August disappearance was 53.7 million bushels, up 238% from the same time last year. QUARTERLY STOCKS (million bushels) (Report date 9/30/16) 9/1/16 Avg High Low 9/1/15 Sep-16 Corn 1,738 1,757 1,862 1,665 1,731 1,716 Soybeans 197 202 256 158 191 195 Grain Sorghum 37 45 51 39 18 35 Wheat 2,527 2,398 2,558 2,100 2,097 NA SMALL GRAINS SUMMARY (million bushels) 2016-2017 Production 9/30/16 Avg High Low Aug-16 2015-16 All Wheat 2,310 2,326 2,350 2,299 2,321 2,062 Winter 1,672 1,662 1,700 1,629 1,657 1,375 HRW 1,082 1,045 1,060 1,000 1,048 830 SRW 345 371 380 355 372 359 White 245 239 278 223 237 185 Spring 534 571 590 531 571 603 Durum 104 93 95 90 92 84

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Livestock

United States Hog Inventory Up 2 Percent , NE Up 9 and KS Up 2

United States inventory of all hogs and pigs on September 1, 2016 was 70.9 million head. This was up 2 percent from September 1, 2015, and up 4 percent from June 1, 2016. Breeding inventory, at 6.02 million head, was up 1 percent from last year, and up 1 percent from the previous quarter. Market hog inventory, at 64.8 million head, was up 3 percent from last year, and up 4 percent from last quarter. The June-August 2016 pig crop, at 32.0 million head, was up 2 percent from 2015. Sows farrowing during this period totaled 3.02 million head, up slightly from 2015. The sows farrowed during this quarter represented 51 percent of the breeding herd. The average pigs saved per litter was a record high 10.58 for the June-August period, compared to 10.39 last year. Pigs saved per litter by size of operation ranged from 8.20 for operations with 1-99 hogs and pigs to 10.60 for operations with more than 5,000 hogs and pigs. Nebraska inventory of all hogs and pigs on September 1, 2016, was 3.55 million head, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. This was up 9 percent from September 1, 2015, and up 3 percent from June 1, 2016. Breeding hog inventory, at 420,000 head, was up 2 percent from September 1, 2015, but down 1 percent from last quarter. Market hog inventory, at 3.13 million head, was up 10 percent from last year, and up 3 percent from last quarter. The June – August 2016 Nebraska pig crop, at 2.10 million head, was up 5 percent from 2015. Sows farrowed during the period totaled 185,000 head, up 3 percent from last year. The average pigs saved per litter was a record high 11.35 for the June – August period, compared to 11.10 last year. Nebraska hog producers intend to farrow 185,000 sows during the September – November 2016 quarter, up 3 percent from the actual farrowings during the same period a year ago. Intended farrowings for December 2016 – February 2017 are 180,000 sows, up 3 percent from the actual farrowings during the same period the previous year. Kansas inventory of all hogs and pigs on September 1, 2016, was 2.00 million head, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. This was up 2 percent from September 1, 2015, and up 3 percent from June 1, 2016. Breeding hog inventory, at 180,000 head, was unchanged from September 1, 2015, but up 3 percent from last quarter. Market hog inventory, at 1.82 million head, was up 2 percent from last year, and up 3 percent from last quarter. The June – August 2016 Kansas pig crop, at 935,000 head, was up 1 percent from 2015. Sows farrowed during the period totaled 89,000 head, down 1 percent from last year. The average pigs saved per litter was a record high 10.50 for the June – August period, compared to 10.30 last year. Kansas hog producers intend to farrow 84,000 sows during the September – November 2016 quarter, down 2 percent from the actual farrowings during the same period a year ago. Intended farrowings for December 2016 – February 2017 are 86,000 sows, down 4 percent from the actual farrowings during the same period the previous year.

Update to Packers and Stockyards Act Passes Congress

Congress voted to modernize the nearly 100-year-old Packers and Stockyards Act (P&S) on Thursday. The vote in the Senate took place just before Congress left on recess, a break that will last until after the elections in November. Introduced by Livestock and Foreign Agriculture Subcommittee Chairman Rep. David Rouzer, R-N.C., in July, HR 5883 focused on online and video livestock auctions, and clarified that P&S requirements apply to these sales. A lack of USDA authority in the area had become a concern for many in the industry. This bill makes it clear that farmers and ranchers selling through online and video auctions are provided similar protections to those selling at fixed facility markets. The bill also modernized methods of payment available for use in cattle auctions. The Livestock Marketing Association (LMA) set the stage for HR 5883, holding industry meetings throughout 2015 that included a nine-stop listening tour. These gatherings were used to gauge support for change and to focus on specifics. Chelsea Good, vice president of government and industry affairs with LMA, described P&S as an antiquated law, passed in 1921. While slight updates to the act have taken place over the years, there has been no comprehensive overhaul. Good said the two primary changes recommended by LMA were included in HR 5883. "We need to recognize that banking practices have modernized, and as long as you are following the timelines, surely you should be able to use a quicker form of payment," she explained. As such, HR 5883 allows the use of additional payment forms, including use of an automated clearing house, credit and debit cards. No current payment methods have been excluded. Good added it was hoped that by allowing for quicker payments, risks of defaults would be reduced. LMA President Jerry Etheredge praised Congress for the swift action in passing the bill. He called the changes "common-sense" and said they will help "bring the law into the 21st Century." HR 5883 advanced through the House Agriculture Committee under the leadership of Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, and Ranking Member Collin Peterson, D-Minn., before passing in the full House and Senate. Additional cosponsors of HR 5883 included Representatives Scott DesJarlais, R-Tenn.; Andy Barr, R-Ky; Trent Kelly, R-Miss; Vicky Hartzler, R-Mo.; Thomas Rooney, R-Fla.; Jim Costa, D-Calif.; David Young, R-Iowa; Water B. Jones, Jr., R-N.C.; Bob Goodlatte, R-Va.; Steven M. Palazzo, R-Miss.; Mike Rogers, R-Ala.; and Robert Pittenger, R-N.C. The Senate companion bill, S 3350, was sponsored by Senators Thad Cochran, R-Miss., and Jon Tester, D-Mont. President Barack Obama has 10 days (excluding Sundays) to sign the bill. Given that Congress is on recess, it is possible HR 5883 could see a pocket veto. This is a veto that essentially happens when the president does nothing, and Congress is out. A pocket veto cannot be overridden, like a regular veto. LMA's Good said while a pocket veto is possible in this case she considers it "highly improbable." "We are close to that threshold, but not quite there yet," she said of the bill becoming law.

US Consumption of Beef and Pork Projected to Rise Through 2025

USDA projections show that production of beef and pork will expand steadily between 2016 and 2025 and result in lower prices, which in turn is expected to increase per capita consumption of both meats, according to the Economic Research Service (ERS). As a result of greater production, beef prices are projected to drop 10.6% and pork prices are projected to drop 11.6% between 2016 and 2025. Cheaper prices will help reverse a multiyear decline in meat consumption in the United States. Per capita consumption of beef is also forecast to increase 2.7% by 2025, outpacing growth in consumption of broilers (2.3%) and pork (1.7%). USDA expects this will increase the total amount of meat consumed per person in the U.S. from 211 pounds in 2015 to nearly 219 pounds by 2025.  

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Technology

Grants Available to SD 4-H Clubs and FFA or FCCLA Chapters

The South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA) announces that grant funding is now available through the Building Our South Dakota Rural Communities (BOSDRC) grant program. As summer comes to an end and school begins across the state, we start getting into a routine again. It’s time to start thinking about those projects in your communities that need a face lift or improvement. These grants were developed to demonstrate the importance of rural communities and the value of organizations that work together to improve rural life and are open to 4-H clubs, FFA chapters, and Family Career and Community Leaders (FCCLA) of America chapters. “Any time we as a state can encourage our youth to get involved in their communities is a great thing,” says South Dakota secretary of agriculture Mike Jaspers. “Not only does learning take place in the classroom, but also whenever our youth learn to take pride in their communities. When they see their efforts help those around them, it makes grant program such as this so worthwhile.” Any 4-H club, FFA or FCCLA chapter in South Dakota can apply for the BOSDRC grant. Two types of grants are available. The basic grant is used for community improvement projects and is limited to $750 per project. The safety grant is used for projects that enhance public safety and is limited to $200 per project. Applications must be submitted or postmarked no later than Oct. 31, 2016. Grant awardees will be announced at the end of November. All applications must be submitted on the official forms for Fiscal Year 2017. Grant application forms and more information on the program, including reporting requirements, are available at http://sdda.sd.gov under the Agricultural Development tab and click on Finance Programs.  Please call 605.773.5436 for questions on this grant program. Agriculture is a major contributor to South Dakota’s economy, generating $25.6 billion in annual economic activity and employing over 115,000 South Dakotans. The South Dakota Department of Agriculture's mission is to promote, protect and preserve this industry for today and tomorrow. Visit us online at http://sdda.sd.gov or find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

American Farm Bureau Insurance Services and Granular Announce Alliance To Simplify Crop Insurance

American Farm Bureau Insurance Services (AFBIS Inc.), a Managing General Agent (MGA) for Approved Insurance Providers (AIP's), has partnered with Granular, leading provider of farm management software, to streamline the crop insurance data collection and reporting processes for agents and their customers. With the alliance, AFBIS agents will be able to get the production reports for their customers via Granular with just a few clicks, making it easier for all parties to share and get the information they need. Both companies have committed to developing automatic crop insurance reporting capabilities by the end of 2016, in advance of spring 2017 acreage and production reporting deadlines. Based in San Francisco, Calif. and Champaign, Ill., Granular's farm management software helps farmers run more profitable businesses by enabling them to manage their operations and analyze their financials for each of their fields in real time. Granular also enables farmers to quickly create reports for third parties such as landowners, bankers, etc. Both Granular and AFBIS share a commitment to working with farmers and agents to strengthen the financial health and risk management of farm businesses through better reporting and more transparency. "Granular works with the most technologically driven farms in the country, and their platform will allow us to uniquely deliver on our promise to make crop insurance easy," said Tim Green, vice president and general manager of AFBIS. "We are thrilled to work with AFBIS to help their agents better partner with farmers to understand and manage risk, and do so in a way that doesn't involve hours of trying to collect and organize the right information," said Sid Gorham, co-founder and CEO of Granular. "It is great to see insurance leaders recognize the value that our software brings to their own customer relationships." To learn more about Granular and AFBIS, visit www.granular.ag and www.FarmBureauSellsCropInsurance.com

CME Group to Transition Dairy Spot Call to CME Direct Auction Platform

CME Group, the world's leading and most diverse derivatives marketplace, today announced that in December it will begin transitioning its CME Dairy Spot Call, for daily price discovery in physical dairy markets, to an electronic, transaction-based auction, which can be accessed through CME Direct. Ultimately, this will replace the physical spot market held via a limited open outcry session on the company's Chicago trading floor that currently facilitates price discovery, trading and delivery of dairy products such as Cheese Barrels, Cheese Blocks, Butter and Nonfat Dry Milk. The dairy products will be transitioned to the platform in two phases beginning December 5 when the Nonfat Dry Milk Spot Call trading session will be made available to customers and market participants through the CME Direct Auction Platform. Butter and Cheese are expected to transition to the auction platform during the first quarter of 2017. "In response to requests from customers and dairy industry participants, we will begin to transition these markets to our transaction-based auction platform accessed through CME Direct," said Tim Andriesen, CME Group Managing Director of Agricultural Products. "We believe this will further enhance the transparency of spot dairy prices, while expanding access to a broader set of commercial customers, brokers and other physical market participants. The Dairy Spot Call is unique to CME Group and assists our customers with physical dairy market price discovery. We will continue working closely with customers to ensure a seamless transition, beginning with Nonfat Dry Milk in December." The transition of the CME Dairy Spot Call to the electronic CME Direct Auction Platform will have no impact on the availability and accessibility of Dairy futures and options products, which are listed with and subject to the rules and regulations of the CME. The CME Direct Auction Platform is an innovative and proven transaction-based auction platform for trading and price discovery in physical spot markets. It provides real-time order management, order history, confirmations and a full audit trail. In 2014, CME Group partnered with the London Bullion Market Association and Thomson Reuters to provide the over-the-counter spot silver market with a transaction-based price-setting mechanism for the LBMA Silver Price. For more information on the CME Dairy futures and options or for information on accessing the CME Dairy Spot Call on the CME Direct Auction Platform, please visit www.cmegroup.com/spotcall.

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Ag Policy

(AUDIO) House Passes WRDA Bill

Yesterday the House of Representatives passed the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 2016 by a vote of 399-25.  The Senate passed its version of WRDA on September 15.  The House and the Senate now need to meet via conference to reconcile the differences between the two versions.  It is expected that Congress will entertain and pass the conference report during a lame duck session following the November election. The Senate did pass their version a couple weeks ago. The Soy Transportation Coalition is appreciative that Congress provided such a strong expression of support for helping to address the profound needs of our nation’s inland waterway system.  Given the increased acrimony in Washington, DC, exacerbated by the impending election, there has been widespread pessimism that Congress this year would achieve a robust portfolio of work important to the American people.  However, it has been hopeful that the passage of a WRDA bill would be one area that could achieve bipartisan support. They are pleased that Congress appears to be getting back to passing a WRDA bill every two years.  One of the challenges confronting the inland waterway system and barge transportation is that it is largely out of sight and therefore out of mind for many policymakers.  A high percentage of lawmakers do not represent districts that witness barge transportation.  As a result, the more time that elapses between one WRDA bill and the next, the more Herculean it becomes to educate and persuade lawmakers to devote attention to the needs of the inland waterway system. There are two legislative steps for Congress to address inland waterway issues: 1.) The authorization step, which a WRDA bill is, and 2.) The appropriations step, which is under the jurisdiction of the respective appropriations committees in the House and Senate.  The authorization step essentially provides the strategy or road map for action.  A list of prioritized projects and initiatives will commonly be included in a WRDA bill.  The appropriations step provides the funding to implement the strategy or road map.  Both steps are essential.  The tradition breakdown in Congress has been the appropriations process not providing sufficient funding to fulfill that objectives prescribed in the WRDA bill.  As a result, the passage of a WRDA bill is appreciated, but it is not the finish line.  We need to continue to advocate for this issue throughout the appropriations process.

(VIDEO) Fischer Discusses OSHA Ruling on Senate Floor

This morning Senator Deb Fischer delivered remarks on the Senate floor regarding the recent court decision against OSHA’s fertilizer storage standards. Below is the video of her remarks.

House Committee Looks Into International Cancer Agency

OMAHA (DTN) -- Because the International Agency for Research on Cancer, or IARC, receives federal funding, the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is launching an inquiry into the National Institutes of Health's support for the group that has made several controversial proclamations about agricultural chemicals and their safety. A House committee is asking questions about federal funds given to the IARC. (Logo courtesy of the World Health Organization) On Monday, Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, the committee chairman, asked in a letter to the National Institute of Health to provide a number of documents and to agree to a briefing with committee staff. Although the IARC's work has faced scrutiny in agriculture circles for its classification of herbicides glyphosate and 2,4-D as "probably carcinogenic" to humans, the IARC has assessed 989 substances as of April 2016. The group determined just one ingredient found in nylon is "probably not" carcinogenic. That means the other 988 substances either pose some level of risk, according to IARC, or require more research to determine the level of risk. In his letter, Chaffetz said conclusions by the IARC have contradicted a body of science on glyphosate, 2,4-D and a number of other substances. "Despite this record of controversy, retractions, and inconsistencies, IARC receives substantial taxpayer funding from NIH," he writes in the letter. "NIH's grant database reflects that the agency has given IARC several millions of dollars since 1992, including over $1.2 million so far this year. "Moreover, IARC's determinations influence American policymaking, even though IARC avoids having to meet the strict scientific standards and government scrutiny afforded to science advisory committees in America." The IARC was created in 1965 and includes the U.S. as one of its founding members. According to a search tool on the NIH website, the institute has issued nine grants for $3.153 million to the IARC this year. The NIH funds more than $32 billion in health research annually. Despite the concern leveled by Chaffetz and others, government agencies in the United States are not bound by IARC determinations. The state of California, however, considers the IARC to be an authoritative body for identifying cancer-causing chemicals. "Following IARC's determination regarding glyphosate, California issued a notice of intent to list the chemical 'as known to the state to cause cancer' under California law," Chaffetz said in the letter. "This listing would subject glyphosate and products containing it, to enhanced consumer warnings and other restrictions. If IARC later decides to adopt the findings of other researchers that glyphosate is not carcinogenic, it could create confusion and other problems in California and elsewhere." The chemical 2,4-D is used to control noxious and invasive weeds. Environmental groups and others have tried to make a connection between the use of 2,4-D today and Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. The component of that jungle herbicide mix connected to health issues of Vietnamese and U.S. soldiers was 2,4,5-T, not 2,4-D. Regulators banned 2,4,5-T decades ago. New formulations of 2,4-D are the foundation of the latest genetically engineered corn and soybean crops aimed at combatting weeds that have evolved to be resistant to glyphosate. Those and similar seed-herbicide packages, which are just coming to market, have increased the debate over the safety of older, growth-regulator herbicides. Chaffetz asked NIH officials to take part in the briefing no later than Oct. 10. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Cancer Assessment Review Committee, or CARC, completed a report last year entitled, "Cancer Assessment Evaluation of the Carcinogenic Potential of Glyphosate." The CARC report posted inadvertently concludes glyphosate is not likely to be carcinogenic to humans. EPA officials posted the report April 29 then removed it May 2. Yet EPA insisted when the agency took down the report that more work needed to be done. The EPA just recently released a 200-plus-page report concluding glyphosate likely was not carcinogenic. Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world, but regulators in both Europe and the U.S. have been reviewing the science and market approval for the herbicide ever since the IARC concluded in March 2015 that glyphosate is "probably carcinogenic" to humans. A House Science Committee investigation also focuses not only on the inadvertent release of the EPA's report last spring, but whether there was any connection between the EPA's analysis and conclusions reached by the IARC. Read the Chaffetz letter here: http://bit.ly/…

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Markets

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