Tag Archives: weather

  • Mother nature reminds folks of who’s in charge with the weather forecast
  • USMCA is official today
  • More perspective of yesterday’s report.
  • Shortened trade week with markets closing at noon on Thursday
  • Some heave short positions as you compare 2019->2020
  • Demand from China for corn & soybeans
  • Hog disease that has popped up on the news circuit
  • China blocking more countries from shipping meat

 

MANHATTAN, Kan. — A Kansas State University veterinarian is urging cattle producers to beef up their plans for managing heat stress in their herds, a challenge that costs the U.S. cattle industry up to $370 million in losses each year.

A.J. Tarpoff, a beef veterinarian with K-State Research and Extension, said cattle are resilient animals; they will often acclimate to hot temperatures.

But an accumulation of factors – including humidity, solar radiation, the color of their hide, diet and more – can drastically change a cow’s ability to withstand summer’s heat.

“It really is a multi-layer challenge,” Tarpoff said. “Each animal within a group or pen is not affected the same way. Animals with higher body condition scores, or with darker hides, or finisher steers and heifers that are getting ready to go to harvest are at higher-risk of heat stress.”

Tarpoff said heat stress decreases the reproductive efficiency and performance of cattle grazing on pasture. In confined facilities, heat stress often causes cattle to eat less, which also negatively affects their performance.

The human body cools itself on a hot day by sweating, called evaporative cooling. But Tarpoff notes that cattle sweat only 10 percent as much as humans, and panting is their primary way of dissipating heat.

“As temperatures rise and their heat load increases, they will start breathing faster,” he said. “They are dissipating heat through tiny droplets in the respiratory tract.”

Doing so, however, causes cows to eat less, setting them on a path to poor growth and future performance.

“This all has to do with heat load,” Tarpoff said. “The internal temperature of cattle will peak two hours after the hottest point of the day. So our strategy for keeping cows cool needs to be built around knowing that.”

Another factor is that cattle produce heat by digesting food, typically four to six hours after eating. “So if we feed animals within the wrong period of time, we can actually increase their heat load because the heat of digestion and the heat from the environment are building on top of each other,” Tarpoff said. “We want to keep that from happening.”

Tarpoff listed best management practices for helping to reduce heat stress in cows:

  • Handling. Receive, ship or move cattle only during the coolest parts of the day, preferably before 10 a.m.
  • Feeding. Modify feeding times. Feed 70 percent of the animals’ ration as late in the evening as possible, which puts the peak heat of digestion overnight when temperatures are likely cooler. Decrease feeding during the day.
  • Managing heat. Split cattle between pens or reduce stocking density. Maximize airflow by removing obstructions around facilities, including weeds. If feasible, install shade structures, which can reduce solar radiation and reduce the temperature on the pen’s floor. Install sprinklers to wet cattle down at night or early morning so as not to increase humidity.

Then, of course, there is the importance of providing water. Lots and lots of water.

“To put it into perspective, when the temperature goes from 70 degrees Fahrenheit to 90 degrees, a cattle will consume about double the amount of water,” Tarpoff said.

As a rule, he said cattle should consume “about five times the amount of water as the dry matter they are consuming.”

“Cool, clean and readily-available water is critical during heat stress events. We may have to increase the water tank capacity within a pen to meet these needs. Producers need to be prepared for that.”

Tarpoff said he follows two sources for help in making a decision when to put a heat stress management plan into full effect.

The U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) maintains a seven-day forecast tool for the United States, taking into account temperature, humidity and solar radiation.

“The other tool I use is the Kansas Mesonet, which provides an animal comfort index,” he said. The Kansas Mesonet, housed at Kansas State University, is a network of observation towers located across the state that updates climate information every hour.

“I know that if we don’t have those night-time cooling hours, the animal won’t be starting each day at thermo-neutral, so they’re more at risk on the second or third day,” Tarpoff said. “That’s when we should start putting in some of these management strategies.”

For more information or assistance, contact your local extension agent.

Markets turn around…a correction that wasn’t a Tuesday.  USDA report out tomorrow.  Will see a quick knee jerk reaction to the report & then the report market reaction will mellow out some.  Will June report have more weight than the September report?  Will the weather & warmth for first part of July be a market issue?  Another pressure point has been COVID-19 & its effects on the markets of soybeans.

 

Some rain in the western corn belt.  Rains were wide spread across the corn belt. Crop progress out this afternoon.  Weekly export report showed some strong numbers for corn, but soft for beans.  Livestock, doesn’t have anything outstanding on the cattle on feed report.  How is consumer demand going, with weather & restaurants starting to reopen.  boxed beef prices averaged the lowest the market’s seen since the week of April 11.  China and trade deal work-banning poultry from Arkansas & Tyson.  Hog market sees week cash

 

Markets had an almost standstill type of feel to it.  How do you market in a day like today.  There is a move to a weather-related market, as winds pick up & rain has stopped in many areas.  Crop Progress report out this afternoon, any surprises expected?  Stabilization to the ethanol market.  So, IS China back into the market for U.S. beans?  The Real has slipped a bit, is there pressure from South America for grain purchases & China?  Livestock, just like grains had an uneventful trading day.  Feeders did push to some higher money, but not by much.  Cash looks to be steady this week, we have a cattle on feed report on Friday.  How will that effect the trade?  Sue is a bit more price positive to the hog market.

 

How did the US numbers look in the WASDE report? Was there any surprises in the world numbers in the WASDE report? Will the corn demand for ethanol need to be lowered more down the road?  How does the export demand look for corn and soybeans? Do you think the crop is on pace to achieve the trend line yields for corn and soybeans?  Will there be much for adjustments in corn and soybean acres down the road? How does the corn and soybean markets look from a technical perspective? What will it take for the markets to move higher from here?  How does the weather look to you going forward? What would you do with unsold old and new crop corn and soybeans?