Tag Archives: NPPC

WASHINGTON, D.C.– Today, Congress released language on its third stimulus package to aid those sectors of the economy impacted by COVID-19. As part of the funding, $14 billion was provided to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Commodity Credit Corporation to help agriculture, as well as a separate appropriation of $9.5 billion for livestock and specialty crops. A Senate vote is scheduled for later today, with the House expected to follow suit shortly thereafter. National Pork Producers Council President Howard “A.V.” Roth, a pork producer from Wauzeka, Wisconsin, had the following statement:

“There is nothing more essential than food and water. U.S. pork producers can’t telecommute and remain hard at work to provide pork products to American kitchens. But we have already suffered losses due to COVID 19-related concerns. These new financial setbacks come on the heels of two very difficult years during which pork was at the tip of the trade retaliation spear. We are pleased that the stimulus package includes funding for much-needed relief to livestock farmers, and we recognize a vote is pending. We look forward to working with Congress and the administration to make sure that all pork producers can access this critically important lifeline as we remain committed to keeping food on American tables.”

WASHINGTON, D.C.– The fallout from an ongoing labor shortage facing the U.S. pork industry and other agriculture sectors could significantly worsen due to the impact of COVID-19, the National Pork Producers Council said in a letter to U.S. government officials today. NPPC’s concerns regarding COVID-19 are labor specific. There is no evidence that pigs can contract the virus.

In a letter to the president and other administration officials, members of Congress, and state governors, NPPC called for expedited solutions addressing the need for more workers on hog farms and in pork plants. It also called on federal, state and local governments to work together to develop a response to COVID-19 that protects public health and, whenever possible, supports animal care and minimizes disruptions to the U.S. pork production supply chain and consumers. NPPC also called on the administration to develop support plans for hog farmers if labor-related bottlenecks in the supply chain prevent hogs from being marketed.

 

“School closures preventing parents from going to work and caring for their animals are already a concern in farm and plant communities,” said NPPC President Howard “A.V.” Roth, a hog farmer from Wauzeka, Wisconsin. “The specter of market-ready hogs with nowhere to go is a nightmare for every pork producer in the nation. It would result in severe economic fallout in rural communities and a major animal welfare challenge.”

 

The U.S. pork industry relies on foreign labor and needs a stable workforce. Even without the additional challenge presented by COVID-19, the labor shortage threatens to increase production costs and food prices for consumers. Existing visa programs are designed for seasonal agriculture, and reform is needed to address the animal care and other requirements of year-round livestock agriculture.

KANSAS CITY, MO., March 6, 2020 – The National Pork Producers Council today elected new officers and members to its board of directors at its National Pork Industry Forum held here.

Howard AV Roth, a hog farmer from Wauzeka, Wis., was elected NPPC president. A fifth-generation farmer, he owns and operates Roth Feeder Pigs. In addition to serving on the NPPC board for the past eight years, Roth previously sat on the Wisconsin Pork Association board of directors and currently serves as chairman of the association’s Swine Health Committee.

 

Roth takes over from David Herring, a hog farmer from Lillington, N.C., who becomes NPPC immediate past president and chairman of the council’s trade and nominating committees.

 

Jen Sorenson was elevated to president-elect. For the past nine years, Sorenson has been with Iowa Select Farms, an Iowa farming business that markets more than five million hogs per year. She grew up on a livestock farm, raising pigs and row crops. Previously, she was communications director for the Iowa Pork Producers Association.

 

Terry Wolters of Pipestone, Minn., was elected by the NPPC board of directors to be vice president. He is active in the Pipestone County Pork Producers Association, Minnesota Pork Producers Association, South Dakota Pork Producers, National Pork Board and committees for each organization. He is chairman of NPPC’s Animal Health Food Security Policy Committee.

 

Robert Ivey of North Carolina and Jeremy Pitman, DVM, of Virginia were elected as new members of the board for a three-year term.

 

They join current directors Craig Andersen, of Centerville, S.D., Scott Hays, of Monroe City, Mo., Dale Reicks of New Hampton, Iowa, Dr. Gordon Spronk, of Pipestone, Minn., Duane Stateler of McComb, Ohio, and Kraig Westerbeek, of Warsaw, N.C. Hays was re-elected to a new, three-year term. Spronk was re-elected to a new, two-year term representing the allied industry.

 

Elected for two-year terms to NPPC’s nominating committee were Jim Petrick of South Dakota and Curt Zehr from Illinois.

 

“AV, Jen and Terry have long-standing and diverse experience that will benefit NPPC and our producers,” said NPPC CEO Neil Dierks. “With the addition of our new board members, NPPC remains well positioned to advocate for the public policy interests of America’s pork producers.”

KANSAS CITY, MO., March 6, 2020 – At the National Pork Industry Forum today, USDA Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Greg Ibach announced an African swine fever (ASF) action plan should the swine-only disease be detected in the United Sates. To date, the United States is free of African swine fever; prevention remains the number one priority for the National Pork Producers Council.

According to the plan, USDA Secretary Perdue would immediately declare an “extraordinary emergency” if ASF was detected in the United States. In doing so, the USDA would be established as the leader of a national, coordinated response to control and eradicate the swine disease, which poses no human health or food safety risks. By declaring an extraordinary emergency, the USDA ensures the availability of funding and other resources to effectively manage response.

“We are grateful to Secretary Perdue and Under Secretary Ibach for hearing the concerns of U.S. pork producers,” said David Herring, NPPC president and a pork producer from Lillington, North Carolina. “We remain committed to working with the USDA and Customs and Border Protection to keep ASF out of the United States.”

 

Other elements of the USDA response plan include:

  • A national stop-movement of pigs order of at least 72-hours with an eye toward restoring movement on a regionalized basis as soon as possible.
  • Depopulation efforts aligned with guidance from the American Veterinary Medical Association and in coordination with state animal health officials and the industry.
  • Support for carcass disposal in line with regional and local requirements (composting and burial in place identified as preferred options.
  • Payments for virus elimination at a uniform, flat rate based on the size of affected premises.