Tag Archives: NCBA

WASHINGTON – National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Vice President, Government Affairs, Ethan Lane, released the following statement in response to a letter from U.S. Sens. John Thune (S.D.) and Mike Rounds (S.D.) regarding beef labeling practices:

“NCBA understands that the practices alleged in the letter from Senator Rounds and Senator Thune are a concern to cattle producers and we share a commitment to clear and truthful labeling. In August, in response to a proposal brought forward by our grassroots members, NCBA formed a working group to examine the prevalence of the alleged mislabeling practices. We are in the process of gathering information related to current industry labeling practices so we can fully understand the scope of the issue as we identify solutions that work for the industry.

“In general, NCBA members are opposed to requesting additional government regulation on our industry. Until we understand the scope of labeling practices currently being utilized, any rush to regulate is an irresponsible step that can create unnecessary and burdensome government mandates. NCBA is actively seeking information on beef labeling practices.

“The creation of government policy or regulation is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of the problem and the involvement of many stakeholders. As our industry is fully aware, any rush toward government regulation can create unintended consequences that take years to unwind.”

WASHINGTON (Oct. 29, 2019) – National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Manager of Legislative Affairs and Market Regulatory Policy Darryl Blakey today released the following statement in response to the U.S. House Agriculture Committee’s approval of legislation reauthorizing the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) —

“We’re pleased to see that the House Committee on Agriculture took the first step towards getting the U.S. CFTC reauthorized. The committee leadership has come together to move this legislation forward in a bipartisan fashion and having this approach has allowed all parties to be honest in their negotiations to build a constructive and sound legislative product that can equip the Commission for the markets our members face today.

“As a representative of true commercial end-users, NCBA has naturally been a part of this reauthorization process from the very beginning by being one of the first organizations knocking on the doors of Congress in the form of meeting with key offices and sending up a thorough letter of support and ideas for a potential CFTC reauthorization package. This included providing tools for reducing systemic risk, ensuring market integrity for end-users, and delivering regulatory consistency, while also considering the important role derivatives markets play in the ability of farmers, ranchers, and agribusinesses to hedge their risks efficiently and effectively.

“Our members are pleased to see that some of our original ideas are in the product today in the form of continued protection for end-users from regulatory burdens, enhancement of the agency’s regulatory tools, and establishing coordination between the Office of the Chief Economist and the Commission to consider a cost-benefit analysis before it’s rulemakings.

“NCBA hopes to continue supporting this legislation as it moves forward in the House, and to working with Congress on getting the CFTC reauthorized because cattlemen and cattlewomen continue to rely on the derivatives markets to manage business risk.”

U.S. Representatives Dusty Johnson (R-S.D.), Liz Cheney (R-WY), and Frank Lucas (R-OK), introduced the Livestock Risk Management and Education Act, a bill that would provide grants to certain state land-grant universities to better equip livestock producers with risk management training.

The Livestock Risk Management and Education Act would authorize the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to provide resources to improve livestock producers’ knowledge of futures markets to better manage market volatility. An understanding of futures contracts and risk management strategies will allow producers both large and small to better anticipate cattle prices. This new authority would allow land-grant universities, such as South Dakota State University, to partner with grower associations to more directly reach producers.

Todd Wilkinson, South Dakota cattle producer and NCBA Policy Division Vice Chair was proud to see the legislation saying, “NCBA applauds Representative Dusty Johnson’s introduction of the Livestock Risk Management and Education Act yesterday on the House floor. This legislation will provide boots-on-the-ground cattle producers with critical resources and opportunities to increase their understanding and engagement with risk management tools. This bill speaks directly to our core values as an industry – arming producers with the latest farm management resources and tools in order to help them navigate ever-changing and dynamic market conditions.

“In a market environment that continues to challenge even the most experienced multi-generational operations, NCBA believes that it is critical for producers to understand their options for managing risk. The Livestock Risk Management and Education Act policy will provide the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture the authority and flexibility to collaborate with industry to ensure that cattle farmers and ranchers have access to those options and the knowledge base to determine which ones are right for their operations. As the oldest and largest national trade association representing the U.S. cattle industry, securing these kinds of educational resources for our members is critical to our vitality into the future.

“NCBA members passed policy that directs us to engage in developing comprehensive programs for NCBA members regarding the mechanics of the commodity futures and options markets and the application of risk management tools. The Livestock Risk Management and Education Act does just that, and NCBA is proud to support this legislation and we look forward to engaging with Congress to advance this bill.”

CENTENNIAL, CO (October 21, 2019) — The long-range strategic planning process for the beef industry is underway, a process that takes months to coordinate and pulls together key leaders from all over the country representing different sectors of the beef business.

THE BEEF INDUSTRY LONG RANGE PLAN

Updated every five years, the Beef Industry Long Range Plan is the standard by which the beef industry focuses on one strategic direction, identifying key areas to advance beef demand.

Since 1995, industry leaders have gathered to develop an aligned, comprehensive plan with the goal of increasing consumer demand for beef. These leaders are brought together to study and compile major areas of opportunity facing beef for the next five years. The current plan, in place since 2016, focuses on increasing beef demand in four key areas:
  • Driving growth in beef exports
  • Protecting and enhancing the business and political climate for beef
  • Growing consumer trust in beef and beef production
  • Promoting and strengthening beef’s value proposition
The newly appointed committee will begin convening over the next several months and will consider all aspects of the industry from production trends, economic factors, foreign markets, consumer trends, and the competitive climate. The group will evaluate the current plan and determine, based on industry trends and insights, where the industry should maintain and/or shift focus over the next five years.

THE 2020 BEEF INDUSTRY LONG RANGE PLAN TASK FORCE

The new plan, which will be effective from 2021 through 2025, will be developed by a group of leaders representing key beef segments from across the industry. This Long Range Plan Task Force will be led by Kim Brackett, owner/operator of Brackett Ranches, a cow-calf and stocker operation in Idaho. “Having helped develop our current long-range plan, I was encouraged with how it has been embraced by the industry, especially by Checkoff committees,” said Brackett. “Our new plan will be researched and fashioned with as much care, and I’m sure be received with as much enthusiasm.”

The balance of the task force includes individuals devoted to ensuring the long-term success of the beef industry.

  • Keith Belk, Department Head of Animal Science, Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO)
  • Tim Brady, Director of Risk Management at Agri Beef packing (Boise, ID)
  • Donnell Brown, Owner/Manager of R.A. Brown Ranch (Throckmorton, TX)
  • John Butler, CEO the Beef Marketing Group, feeder (Manhattan, KS)
  • Paul Defoor, Co-CEO at Cactus Feeders, Inc. (Amarillo, TX)
  • Joe Goggins, Auction Market/Seedstock (Billings, MT)
  • Ken Griner, President of Usher Land & Timber, Inc., cow/calf and seedstock (Chiefland, FL)
  • Mary Kraft, Dairy Owner/Operator (Fort Morgan, CO)
  • Jon Lowe, Sr. VP, Cattle & Equine Business, Zoetis animal health (Parsippany, NJ)
  • Dean Meyer, Farmer/Feeder (Rock Rapids, IA)
  • William Rishel, Rishel Ranch, seedstock (Lincoln, NE)
  • Suzy Strassburger, President, Strassburger Steaks, LLC, a specialty meat purveyor (Carlstadt, NJ)
  • Jerry Wulf, Partner/Advisor Wulf Cattle, seedstock (Hancock, MN)

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association has said the Organization for Competitive Markets is using half-truths and smear tactics to pit beef producers against each other.

The association said it’s clear that the Humane Society of the U.S. has taught the OCM staff some tricks to help them tear apart the beef industry from the inside. It’s no coincidence that they’ve chosen to do so at a time when the industry is struggling with market-related challenges and producer unrest to fire their latest shots.

The NCBA points out that the OCM and HSUS would like farmers to think that the industry is weak when, in reality, the demand for beef is strong. That demand has been climbing for many years in both the United States and overseas. Much of that increasing strength comes from programs that are funded by the Beef Checkoff. HSUS opposes growth because they are against the consumption of animal products.

The NCBA said HSUS and the OCM are organizing and funding an ongoing smear campaign. Discrediting the beef checkoff and the work done by contracting organizations allows the Humane Society, the OCM, and R-CALF to build up their membership numbers.

The NCBA noted division within the beef industry serves no one but the industry’s adversaries.