Tag Archives: Kansas Wheat

Hidden in the stubble of 2019’s wheat harvest, wheat curl mites are moving to find sprouting volunteer wheat seedlings to inhabit and continue the life cycle of wheat streak mosaic virus. The wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) instigated by these mites seriously affects the total yield of a wheat crop.

 

On average, WSMV causes $75 million in losses to Kansas wheat farmers every year. Wheat Streak Mosaic can cause a yield loss of more than 80 percent. WSMV isn’t treatable, but it is preventable. If we take preventative measures now, future yields will improve exponentially.

 

The virus is spread by the wheat curl mite, which feeds on wheat and other grasses. Wheat curl mites and the virus must have green host tissue to survive on throughout the summer after harvest. They most commonly reside on volunteer wheat that blew out the back of the combine or shattered grain from hail storms that happened before harvest. The mites on the fallen kernels move to the sprouting volunteer seedlings as new plants emerge in the summer.

 

Volunteer wheat is considered a “green bridge” because it allows the wheat curl mites and the virus to survive the summer.

 

Losses due to WSMV depend on variety, weather, percentage of infected plants and the time of infection. The first visible symptoms usually pop up in April on the edges of fields near volunteer wheat. Yellow streaking and mosaic patterns on young leaves and stunted tillers are some of the first signs. Symptoms worsen as the weather warms. Leaves on the infected plants turn yellow from the tip down, but usually the leaf veins remain green the longest. This gives the appearance of a striped yellow and green leaf, if the leaf is able to unfurl completely at all.

 

The best way to prevent the spread of the wheat streak mosaic virus is to remove volunteer wheat and other grassy weeds. Volunteer wheat must be completely dead and dry for two weeks before planting a new wheat crop. Volunteer wheat and other grassy weeds can be killed with herbicides or tillage.

 

A second management practice to limit the spread of the virus is to avoid early planting. Plant wheat after the “hessian fly free date” for your area. In some areas in western Kansas where there is no Hessian fly-free date, farmers should choose to wait until late September or October to plant their wheat. Planting after these dates will reduce the risk for the new wheat crop and reduce wheat curl mites from moving to new locations of wheat.

 

In addition, there are a few wheat varieties with moderate resistance to this devastating disease. Hard white wheats Joe and Clara CL, as well as hard red winter wheat Oakley CL have performed well in areas with wheat streak mosaic.
This resistance is not perfect and these plants may still be susceptible to triticum mosaic or high plains mosaic viruses. The resistance to wheat streak mosaic is less effective at temperatures above 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Therefore, planting these varieties early for grazing can place fields at risk for disease-related yield losses.
Undoubtedly, the best method to control WSMV is controlling the volunteer wheat.

 

Be a good steward, and a good neighbor, when making these management decisions, and you might just be rewarded with a boost in bushels on your next wheat crop.

 

For more information on controlling volunteer, head to K-State Agronomy’s E-Update resource.

MANHATTAN, Kan. — The Kansas Association of Wheat Growers will hold its annual membership meeting on August 14, 2019, in conjunction with High Plains Journal’s Sorghum U – Wheat U event.

The annual meeting will begin at 7:00 a.m., in the Fire Club Room at the Kansas Star Event Center, 777 Kansas Star Drive in Mulvane.

Grower members will discuss and debate the policies of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and will vote on renewing KAWG Resolutions. They will hear an update on KAWG activities and priorities, as well as the announcement of a membership referral program that can earn members some unique wheat gear while building grassroots support for the issues facing wheat farmers in Topeka and Capitol Hill.

At the conclusion of the KAWG annual meeting, members are invited to join other wheat and grain sorghum producers to stay for the Sorghum U – Wheat U educational event, which features breakout sessions on grain sorghum and wheat. There is no charge to attend the Sorghum U – Wheat U event, and lunch will be provided.

Wheat and sorghum producers can take home real-world, practical solutions that can have a definite influence on their bottom line. With educational sessions targeted to wheat growers, sorghum growers and sessions for both, producers can develop a strategy that will allow them to take control and plan for profit. This event will also have CEU credits offered. Having multiple sessions and speakers filled with knowledge, this event will benefit any farmer that attends.

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., with the program starting at 9 a.m. During the welcome session, attendees will hear from a panel of farmers as well as the Kansas Wheat and Kansas Grain Sorghum organizations.

During Breakout Blocks 1 and 2, farmers will be able to choose from the following four sessions: Making “Cents” of Blockchain Technology, Make Cropping Systems Work For You, Lessons in Wheat Production and Risk Management for Sorghum Producers. These blocks will repeat, so farmers will have the opportunity to attend two of the four. Kansas State University Wheat and Forages Extension Specialist Romulo Lollato will present the session on wheat production.

Over lunch, Arlan Suderman, chief commodities economist with INTL FCStone, will present the keynote address on “Market Intelligence for the Future.” Market intelligence helps producers plan ahead for influences on grain markets that are out of a producer’s control. Suderman has years of experience working with farmers and helping them understand the markets. From late planting problems this spring to trade wars to African Swine Fever, Suderman will give producers an outlook that will help them make sound decisions. Following Suderman’s presentation, John Lawrence will be speaking on “IntelliFarms: Grow with a Purpose.”

Topics for Breakout Blocks 3 and 4 include Planning with Your Lender, Making the Grain Chain Work for You, Risk Management for Wheat Producers and Growing Forage Sorghum for Profit. The event will wrap up at 3:00 p.m., following the IntelliFarms $20,000 Giveaway.

For more information on the speakers and topics and to register for this free event, go to wheatu.com.

The Kansas Association of Wheat Growers will hold its annual membership meeting on August 14, 2019, in conjunction with High Plains Journal’s Sorghum U – Wheat U event.

The annual meeting will begin at 7:00 a.m., in the Fire Club Room at the Kansas Star Event Center, 777 Kansas Star Drive in Mulvane.

 

Grower members will discuss and debate the policies of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and will vote on renewing KAWG Resolutions. They will hear an update on KAWG activities and priorities, as well as the announcement of a membership referral program that can earn members some unique wheat gear while building grassroots support for the issues facing wheat farmers in Topeka and Capitol Hill.

 

At the conclusion of the KAWG annual meeting, members are invited to join other wheat and grain sorghum producers to stay for the Sorghum U – Wheat U educational event, which features breakout sessions on grain sorghum and wheat. There is no charge to attend the Sorghum U – Wheat U event, and lunch will be provided.

 

Wheat and sorghum producers can take home real-world, practical solutions that can have a definite influence on their bottom line. With educational sessions targeted to wheat growers, sorghum growers and sessions for both, producers can develop a strategy that will allow them to take control and plan for profit. This event will also have CEU credits offered. Having multiple sessions and speakers filled with knowledge, this event will benefit any farmer that attends.

 

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., with the program starting at 9 a.m. During the welcome session, attendees will hear from a panel of farmers as well as the Kansas Wheat and Kansas Grain Sorghum organizations.

 

During Breakout Blocks 1 and 2, farmers will be able to choose from the following four sessions: Making “Cents” of Blockchain Technology, Make Cropping Systems Work For You, Lessons in Wheat Production and Risk Management for Sorghum Producers. These blocks will repeat, so farmers will have the opportunity to attend two of the four. Kansas State University Wheat and Forages Extension Specialist Romulo Lollato will present the session on wheat production.

 

Over lunch, Arlan Suderman, chief commodities economist with INTL FCStone, will present the keynote address on “Market Intelligence for the Future.” Market intelligence helps producers plan ahead for influences on grain markets that are out of a producer’s control. Suderman has years of experience working with farmers and helping them understand the markets. From late planting problems this spring to trade wars to African Swine Fever, Suderman will give producers an outlook that will help them make sound decisions. Following Suderman’s presentation, John Lawrence will be speaking on “IntelliFarms: Grow with a Purpose.”

 

Topics for Breakout Blocks 3 and 4 include Planning with Your Lender, Making the Grain Chain Work for You, Risk Management for Wheat Producers and Growing Forage Sorghum for Profit. The event will wrap up at 3:00 p.m., following the IntelliFarms $20,000 Giveaway.

 

For more information on the speakers and topics and to register for this free event, go to wheatu.com.

This is day 16, the final day of the 2019 Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Wheat harvest has essentially wrapped up in Kansas with last week’s hot dry weather.

According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, Kansas winter wheat harvest is 96 percent complete, near 100 last year and 98 for the five-year average.

Erik Lange, Senior Vice President and chief operating officer, MKC, says their more than 40 locations across Kansas have taken in about two-thirds of their 5-year average on bushels, due to reduced acres because of the wet conditions last fall. MKC is located in 24 counties across Kansas, from Seward County in the southwest to Sumner County in south central to Pottawatomie County in the north east.

Lange reported that overall, harvest was about 2 to 2 ½ weeks later than normal statewide but a little less delayed in the west. He said yields varied widely across the state.

In south central counties, yields were below average, and in central counties, yields were quite a bit lower than normal, due to rain. Further to the north and east, there were good yields in areas, but not in the low lying areas. He said that in southwest Kansas, this year’s harvest was some of the best wheat in years.

Test weights in the trade territory ranged from average to above average in most locations. There were a few places in central and south central Kansas that got some rains on mature wheat where test weights were slightly below average.

Proteins also varied by location. In the west, Lange reported that proteins were well below average, ranging from 10 ½ to 11 ½ percent, with spotted areas of 12s. In central and south central Kansas, proteins ranged from 10 ½ to 12 percent, which is above a normal average of 10 ½ to 11 percent.

Lange reported that most of harvest is wrapped up, but they are still waiting on mudholes. He said, “Spring was a battle. We appreciate the rain, but timing could have been better.”

He said acres that were planted late were not as good as the early planted. He predicts that acres may go up slightly in MKC’s trade territory this fall, but he is skeptical on how many acres that is, saying “If corn and beans come off in a timely manner, there may be some more wheat planted this fall. Weather played such a factor in acreage this year.”

Eric Sperber, GM/CEO at Cornerstone Ag, in Colby, said this was “one of the quickest harvests we’ve had in a long time,” reporting that they took in 95% of their receipts between July 10-19.

Sperber said this year’s harvest was about 1 ½ to 2 weeks late. They took their first load of wheat on July 3; their previous latest start date was July 1.

He said that yields were excellent in northwest Kansas, with customers calling it their “best crop ever” and a “once in a lifetime crop.” Test weights were also very good, averaging 61.5 to 62 pounds per bushel. He reports that the proteins were the lowest average he has seen in his 15 years with Cornerstone, averaging 10.7 percent.

Sperber said they took in more hard white wheat this year than in the previous three years combined. He said the majority of the hard white wheat was the Kansas Wheat Alliance variety Joe, and that farmers were pleased with Joe. Some farmers reported that they planted Joe last fall because of concerns about wheat streak mosaic virus and its resistance to the disease.

Acres in the area were largely unchanged from the past couple years, but still some of the lowest acres in recent history. Sperber reports that they took in about 125 percent of normal receipts, due to the excellent yields.

“It was an excellent harvest,” he said. “It was about the fifth best total receipts in the 15 years I’ve been here, on some of the lowest acres.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 14 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

About two weeks behind schedule, wheat harvest in Kansas is progressing quickly with high temperatures this week about 100°F in northwest Kansas.

According to Larry Glenn, of Frontier AG Inc. in Quinter in Gove County, harvest is 85-90% complete in the area. Glenn reported that yields are above average in the western third of the state. Harvest was delayed and started out slow, but then moved very quickly.

Glenn said they started paying protein premiums last year and added protein testers in all locations. Protein is averaging about 10.5%.

Storage is an issue in the area, with the bunker in Quinter full. They are getting some rail cars in to start moving grain as the elevator space gets tight.

“We’ve been blessed with rains in this area,” Glenn said, adding that the rains didn’t come too much at a time like other areas. While there was some hail, it was spotty and didn’t cause widespread damage.

“We are well above last year on bushels, which was a good year,” Glenn said.

Larry Snow of Heartland Mills in Marienthal in Wichita County, reports that yields are way above average, but proteins are way below, estimating high 10s for most of the organic wheat they buy. Fortunately for the mill, they have been able to source higher protein wheat from other areas in the high plains.

“There will be a lot of 8s and 9s that would take too much to blend up, so it will end up as organic feed wheat,” said Snow. He said that harvest has been about two weeks late and is nearing completion. He added, “Test weights are really good.”

Ken Wood, who farms near Chapman in Dickinson County, wrapped up wheat harvest this last Saturday. Wood said they had good yields that were on higher ground in the fields and some lower yields where water stood for a longer period of time. Wood says they don’t test proteins, but they had solid test weight numbers for the year.

“I was pleased with the outcome that we had this year. It turned out better than we expected,” Wood said.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 13 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Harvest continues to roll through northern Kansas as farmers try to pick up the pace to make up for some lost time. Yields continue to be highly variable throughout the state, with some areas seeing double the county averages, while others are making 25-30 bushels per acre. Pockets of protein continue to be reported in localized areas of the state.

Lynn Moore, a farmer near Pittsburg, finished wheat harvest about two weeks ago. Moore says they had solid yields throughout harvest, and test weights ranged in the upper 50’s.

“It was unexpected for wheat harvest to go as well as it did, but we are just glad it is done and out of the field,” Moore said.

Dell Princ, of Midway Coop Association in Osborne County, reported that they are in the final stages of their wheat harvest this year.

“These are some of the best yields we have seen, considering the year we have had,” Princ said. With solid test weights and proteins ranging from 11-11.5%, Princ is pleased with this year’s harvest.

Chris Tanner, a farmer near Norton, reported that he began his harvest on July 4th (when they normally finish up) but had to press pause for rains until July 12. He is currently about halfway done. He estimates that this year’s county average is in the mid-50s, with some acres seeing upwards of 90 bushels an acre, but others averaging only 25 bushels per acre. Tanner says that fertilized fields are yielding much better, and that proteins in the area are ranging from 10.5-11%. Test weights are 61-63 pounds per bushel. The Syngenta/AgriPro variety Bob Dole is performing very well for Tanner.

“Weather made it difficult to get wheat drilled, and a lot of guys got it in late,” said Tanner. “Spring moisture made it hard to get fertilizer on. Everything has been a fight for us — calving, spraying, planting and overly saturated soils.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 11 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

The hot, dry weekend weather was just what farmers needed to make some excellent progress on wheat harvest in Kansas.

Mike McClellan, who farms in Rooks County, is wrapping up his wheat harvest on Monday. Their harvest started on July 1, and they have seen good yields and test weights, but lower than average protein levels.

“We’ve had a really good harvest run this year,” said McClellan. “We’re pretty happy with the yields. No complaints here.” He added, “We’re ready to wrap it up.”

McClellan reports that the area is about 80-90% finished with wheat harvest.

“We’ve been pleasantly surprised on some fields, and disappointed on others,” he said. Yields have ranged from 20 on a field with hail damage to 80s on his best wheat. Test weights have remained over 60 pounds per bushel, and his proteins have been lower than average, which he partially attributes to the fact that they were late getting nitrogen on because of the moisture. He said he has neighbors who have gotten as high as 12s on protein.

Wheat harvest for Lisa Schemm, who farms in Wallace and Logan counties, got into full swing on July 10. They had started cutting on July 4, but rains kept them out of the fields until last week. A normal start date for them is June 25. A severe storm on June 22 hit some of their wheat and corn hard with hail.

Schemm reports that they are now a little over half done with harvest. She says that yields are above average, and test weights have remained well above 60, ranging from 62-63. Areas that had to be replanted aren’t yielding as well, so planting date has definitely had an effect on yields. Their protein levels have been coming in about 10.5%.

Schemm says the Kansas Wheat Alliance variety Kanmark has been performing well for them this year. She says morale is a little higher in their area, with the excellent yields and a slightly higher wheat price. Overall, wheat harvest is going well; it’s just behind schedule. She hopes to wrap up by the end of the week.

Brian Linin, a farmer from Goodland in Sherman County, started his harvest on July 8, and they’ve been rolling ever since. His wheat is yielding quite a bit above average, ranging from 70 bushels per acre and up. Test weights are 61.5 to 62 pounds per bushel, and proteins are ranging from 11.5 to 13%.

Linin says this is an above average year, with good quality wheat and good kernel size. He reports that he has about 1,200 acres left to cut, so their harvest will last about another week. The WestBred variety WB-Grainfield and a WB-Grainfield/PlainsGold Langin blend are performing well for him.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 10 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

With dry weather in northwest Kansas this week, many farmers in the area are finally getting to start harvesting their first fields of the 2019 crop. Yields are above average and while most of the state is seeing below average protein, there are pockets of protein in several areas.

According to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Kansas winter wheat production is forecast at 330 million bushels, up 19 percent from last year. Average yield is forecast at 50 bushels per acre, up 12 bushels from 2018. Area to be harvested for grain is estimated at 6.60 million acres, down 10 percent from a year ago.

Casey Andersen, a 4th generation farmer in Gove County south of Oakley, reports that his family got started with harvest on July 8, the latest start that he or his dad can remember.

Yields are above average due to rain and the cool, wet fill period. He said, “It has been an excellent year for wheat.”

He has about two weeks of harvest left, and Oakley CL is a variety that has been performing well on his farm. The main issue they have had this year is some lodging due to the excessive moisture.

Andersen reports test weights of 63-64 pounds on Oakley CL, and proteins ranging from 10.5 to 11.5%.

Jennifer Princ of Midway Coop Association in Luray reports that they took their first load of wheat in on June 26, their latest start since 1996. They are 90-95% complete with harvest in their area.

She said yields in their area have ranged from 18 to 104, with a strong correlation between planting date and yield. The overall average yield for their farmers is 50-60 bushels per acre. Princ said test weights have averaged 61.2 pounds per bushel, and protein average is 12.04%.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 8 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Scattered storms continue to be a theme for #WheatHarvest19 with farmers in the state playing “hurry up and wait.” According to USDA NASS winter wheat condition in the state is rated 4 percent very poor, 11 poor, 27 fair, 42 good and 16 excellent. Winter wheat mature was 92 percent. Harvested was 61 percent, well behind 89 last year and 84 for the five-year average.

David Janzen, a farmer from Butler County, is trying to wrap up his harvest this year, with about 80 acres left to cut. He is hoping the rain stays away long enough for him to get done. Janzen is seeing yields that vary from field to field, but he is fairly pleased with the yields he is seeing, considering the amount of rain he has received this year.

“We are just thankful that we still have a crop to cut,” Janzen said.

Ron Suppes, a farmer in Lane County, has come to a standstill with his wheat harvest as it began to rain again today. His area has had quite a few rain showers with high humidity, which is making it difficult for local farmers to get into the fields. With the wheat that they have harvested, Suppes reports consistent protein levels at 10-11.5% and above average yields.

Romulo Lollato, Wheat and Forages Extension Specialist with K-State Research and Extension, reported yields in south central and central Kansas have been highly variable (due to planting dates and moisture surpluses that drowned out quite a few acres), while out west, farmers are consistently seeing above average yields. Some areas in western Kansas are still seeing some green wheat because it was late getting planted. Test weights throughout the state continue to hold steady at 60 pounds per bushel and above.

“Since September 1, the central part of the state has received over 60 inches of rain, and the rain got in the way of grain production early on,” Lollato said.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.