Tag Archives: Harvest

MANHATTAN, Kan. (AP) — A new government report shows Kansas farmers are harvesting fewer bushels of winter wheat this year. The forecast released Friday is based on crop conditions July 1.

The Agriculture Department’s National Agricultural Statistics Service revised the government’s earlier estimate downward to 307 million bushels in Kansas. That is 9% fewer bushels than were cut last year in the state. The latest forecast is based on an average yield of 48 bushels per acre, down 4 bushels from 2019.

It also estimates growers in Kansas will cut 6.4 million acres of wheat, down 2% from last year.

After extreme highs and lows in Nebraska throughout the wheat growing season, harvest has finally begun. Producers along the southern border and in the southwest corner of the state have cleaned and tuned up their combines and are hitting the fields this week. As the month progresses we will see harvest continue to move into the northern panhandle to wrap up Nebraska’s wheat growing season.

Mother Nature was not kind to wheat farmers this year. Hard late freezes, minimal moisture and one of the hottest June’s in history took its toll on the state’s crop. “The April freezes claimed some fields and also left the crop standing shorter than normal” said Royce Schaneman, Executive Director of the Nebraska Wheat Board. “Producers were continually weary throughout the season due to the lack of rain paired with hot, windy days. The soil moisture seemed to be continually depleted.”

For most of the state, harvest is beginning earlier than normal with the exception of the southeast corner being a week late. Mark Knobel, a wheat farmer from Fairbury, NE said “I expect yields to be average this year. Protein content should be good due to the lower yields, though we may find ourselves in trouble if we get low test weights.”

Along with Hard Red Winter wheat, Nebraska will also be harvesting around 10,000 acres of Hard Red Spring wheat this year. The Hard Red Spring variety began appearing in the state a few years ago as farmers looked for alternative wheat markets and value added products. Acres planted has been on a gradual increase, though this year’s crop may not fair the best. “My spring wheat is standing 10” tall,” explained Brent Robertson, a wheat farmer near Elsie, NE. “It is beginning to turn, though I don’t expect to see a good return on it this year.”

As the Nebraska wheat harvest goes into full effect this upcoming week, producers will gain a better understanding of where their crop stands this year. There are many predictions of an average crop and the United States Department of Agriculture is predicting a 44.4 million bushel harvest.

To stay up to date on the Nebraska wheat harvest, follow the Nebraska Wheat Board on Twitter at @NebraskaWheat or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nebraskawheatboard.

The Nebraska Wheat Board administers the check-off of 0.4% of net value of wheat marketed in Nebraska at the point of first sale.  The board invests the funds in programs of international and domestic market development and improvement, policy development, research, promotion, and education.

This is day 8 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Laryce Schweiterman, who farms and raises seed wheat near Syracuse in Hamilton County, reports that they tried to start harvest on June 19, but moisture was too high, so they didn’t start again until June 22. So far, yields have been surprisingly good, averaging 40-50 bushels per acre, especially considering they have only received about 3″ of rain during the growing season. They only planted about half of their normal wheat acres last year because they had a lot of moisture and could grow corn. Since then, moisture has been elusive, so they are planning to plant a lot more acres of wheat this fall.

The PlainsGold varieties Whistler and Langin and Kansas Wheat Alliance varieties Joe and Dallas have been performing well for them. They grow both hard red winter and hard white wheat.

Test weights have averaged 58-60 pounds per bushel and protein is averaging 11-12%. She estimates that harvest will be complete in the next 5-6 days.

Rusty Morehead from Progressive Ag in Wellington in Sumner County, reports that harvest started back up again on Tuesday, after they received from 1 to 5″ of rain across their region over the weekend. He said test weight has dropped a little, but it’s still above 60 pounds per bushel. He estimates that harvest will be nearly complete before the next forecasted rain this weekend.

Troy Presley from CoMark Equity Alliance LLC in Cheney in Sedgwick County, reports they their area started harvesting again Tuesday, after 1.25-2.5″ of rain over the weekend. He said they are about 80% complete. Test weights went down about 1 point, but remain above 60 pounds per bushel.

Calvin Williamson, who farms in Ford and Clark counties, reports that he received about 2″ of rain over the weekend. His yields have averaged 60-70 bushels per acre, which is quite a bit higher than he expected. Williamson estimates that he will be finished with harvest in 2-3 days. The varieties T-158 and TAM114 are performing well. Test weights are 60-62 pounds per bushel, and protein is highly variable, ranging from below 10% to more than 12%.

The 2020 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use # wheatharvest20. Tag us at @kansaswheat on FacebookInstagram and Twitter to share your harvest story and photos.

 

Wheat harvest, July options, many balls in the air with many things being tossed at it over the weekend into the Sunday night trade.  China talk let’s get a confirmation before the markets take reaction.  Crude oil sees a bit of a rally.  Boxed beef has taken another drop…dog days of summer hitting many how does it effect consumer demand.  COVID-should we have another shelter place how is that going to effect & the back log of cattle.

This is day 5 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Stephanie Bell from Skyland Grain, Hugoton, in Stevens County, reports that the area is about 75% done with harvest, with mostly irrigated fields remaining. Harvest has been running smoothly and they expect to be done by the end of the week. She said yields have been better than expected. Test weight is averaging 61 pounds per bushel, and proteins are ranging from 11-12%. Acres in the area are down from last year.

Roger Rohr, who farms in Seward County, said his harvest began on June 13 and he has about three days left. Yields have been better than expected, averaging about 50 bushels per acre. He did have some freeze damage with heads not fully filled. While he had fewer acres of wheat this year, he expects to plant more this fall.

Ernie Theilen, OK Coop Grain Co, Kiowa, in Barber County, reports that they took in their first load on June 7 and that the area is about 90% complete. Yields have been really good this year; most have been above average. He attributes this to the overall growing season, newer varieties and good grain fill weather. While proteins have been slightly lower than average, some of the later wheat they received had higher proteins than earlier wheat. This year’s crop has been really exceptional and had above average test weights.

Randy Fritzemeier who farms in Stafford County, reports that he began harvest on June 16. Harvest has been really good for him so far, with above average yields, ranging from 40 to 70 bushels per acre. He has about a week to 10 days of harvest remaining, and says he may be one of the earlier people in the county to find wheat that is dry enough to cut.

“Some people can’t find any dry wheat,” he said. He planted the Kansas Wheat Alliance varieties Zenda and Larry this year, and they are performing well for him.

“We received moisture at the right times and cool weather for grain fill,” he said. “And, no mud holes this year.”

The 2020 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use # wheatharvest20. Tag us at @kansaswheat on FacebookInstagram and Twitter to share your harvest story and photos.

 

This is day 4 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Wheat harvest has been progressing quickly in Kansas’ southern counties and is moving farther north every day. Test weights and yields have been good in most locations. Weather forecasts for Thursday evening through Saturday are calling for chances of rain and thunderstorms, which could put a halt to harvest for a few days.

Rusty Morehead from Progressive Ag in Wellington in Sumner County reports that wheat harvest began on June 6. They are around 65-70% finished and expect to be complete within the next week. Yields are averaging around 55 bushels per acre, and most of the fields have big, full wheat heads. The average protein is 10%, but some is as high as 11-12%. Average test weight is 63 pounds per bushel.

According to Todd Dean of ADM Grain Co. of Greensburg in Kiowa County, farmers were starting to harvest on June 9, which was slightly earlier compared to normal. Yields have been averaging around 40 bushels per acre for continuous wheat and 65 bushels per acre for fallow. Test weights have been good at 62.25 pounds per bushel.

Bryce Ackerman from Offerle Coop Grain & Supply Co. in Edwards County reports that harvest began June 12 in Bucklin and their northern areas started the following day. Progress is rolling smoothly, but rain in the forecast Thursday could slow it down. Yields are averaging 50-60 bushels per acre this year, as expected, but that is not better than last year. Proteins have been variable, ranging from 9% to as high as 13%, with the overall average in the 10s. Test weights are great, averaging 62 to 64 pounds per bushel.

The 2020 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use # wheatharvest20. Tag us at @kansaswheat on FacebookInstagram and Twitter to share your harvest story and photos.

 

This is day 3 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Reports from the southern counties of Kansas indicate that harvest is continuing to progress with above average yields; however, areas slightly to the north are still a little too wet and green for harvest to get rolling, but are drying out quickly.

Mark Lubber with WestBred reports that harvest started on Wednesday, June 10, in Kiowa in Barber County. He said they are seeing better than expected yields, mostly in the mid-40s in Barber County, but higher in the south central part of the state. Protein levels are slightly lower than average, ranging from 9-10%. He speculates that this is mainly because farmers shorted inputs because of pessimism on the yields and in the market. He said that the hot and dry weather conditions and lack of nightly dew is allowing combines to run easily.

Troy Presley from CoMark Equity Alliance LLC in Cheney in Sedgwick County reports that harvest in their area began on June 12. He said that harvest started quickly, but has slowed down a little bit because there is still some green in the fields. He expects harvest in the area to be 75% complete by the end of the week. Yields are averaging about 15-20% better than expected, due to good fill and big heads. The area is averaging about 50-55 bushels per acre. He said while protein is a little lower this year, there is a lot of variability. Test weights are great, averaging 63.5 pounds. The area didn’t have much disease and they did see some fungicide application. He estimates that they will be finished in 12 days, assuming they don’t receive rains.

Martin Kerschen, who farms in Sedgwick and Reno Counties, reports that his harvest began on Saturday, June 13. He says they are pretty happy with harvest and their yields, which have been near 70 bushels per acre. The fields that were sprayed with fungicide are a few days behind the ones that weren’t sprayed, so they haven’t started cutting their best fields yet. The weather has been good for harvest, with dry and windy conditions, but they would like a rain soon to help their fall crops. While many people have cut back their wheat acres to switch to other crops, he hasn’t. “We’ve made as much money on wheat as we have on corn and soybeans over the past few years,” he said.

Kevin Kelly from Two Rivers Coop in Arkansas City in Cowley County reports that harvest began on June 5 and will be complete by the coming weekend. This is much earlier than last year, when they weren’t finished until the last week of July. He said test weights have been high, averaging 63 pounds. Yields are higher than expected as they had good grain fill.

Jill Zimmerman who farms in Cowley County reports that harvest is going really well. Their wheat is yielding 45-80 bushels per acre, with some even higher than that. She said protein is ranging from 9-12%, and test weight is averaging 64-66 pounds. She says it has been a really good year.

The 2020 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use # wheatharvest20. Tag us at @kansaswheat on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to share your harvest story and photos.

 

MANHATTAN, Kan. — This is day 1 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Wheat harvest is just barely getting started in extreme south central Kansas as farmers try to get into their fields. Test cutting in the area began as early as June 6, but most areas are just not quite ready. With ideal harvest weather (hot temperatures, dry conditions and strong winds) forecast over the next ten days, fields will dry out quickly, and combines should be able to get rolling over the upcoming weekend.

A very preliminary report of above average yields and exceptional test weights – similar to fields harvested in central Oklahoma – came from a custom cutter in southern Harper County.

On June 11, USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service released their June Crop Production report, increasing the estimated yield for the state to 49 bushels per acre, up from 47 bushels per acre in the May report. Total statewide winter wheat production for Kansas is now estimated at 315.5 million bushels.

The 2020 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest20. Tag us at @kansaswheat on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to share your harvest story and photos.

Funds are liquidating during the day trade after liquidating overnight.  Buy corn/sell beans is the feel.  Weather is the market right.  No major signs of drought in the Midwest.  Crop progress info out later this afternoon.  Southwest Kansas dry but not drought dry.  Brazil should be releasing final bean & corn estimates.  Shouldn’t be a surprise to see a large number of soybeans & unchanged on the corn.  S&D Report comes out on Thursday.  Not a lot of replant going on across the U.S.  we need the problems to adjust the markets, but we must live in reality.   Ethanol margins remain stable.