Tag Archives: ethanol

Kansas Corn is partnering with Renew Kansas to host the Kansas Corn-Fed Ethanol Seminar. Happening on March 4 at American Ag Credit, 4105 N. Ridge Rd., Wichita, this seminar will provide attendees with updates and learning opportunities covering a broad view of the ethanol industry.

 

“With nearly one-third of Kansas corn going directly into ethanol production,” said Kansas Corn Director of Industry Relations Stacy Mayo-Martinez. “It is important for those in the corn and agriculture industry to understand the market, the opportunities and the hurdles to better grasp how it affects Kansas corn prices. This is a unique learning opportunity and we are proud to partner with Renew Kansas.”

 

The seminar will explore ethanol export opportunities; barriers to increased ethanol use and connecting consumers with ethanol blends. A fuel retailer panel and an expert panel on economic impact and plant innovation will round out the seminar.

 

Kansas is a significant ethanol producing state producing about 500 million gallons of ethanol per year and represents a significant market for corn producers. About one-third of Kansas corn is used to make ethanol and DDGS feed, the co-product of ethanol production.

 

Those interested in the event can find more information and register online at https://kscorn.com/cornfedethanol/.

 

Kansas Corn represents corn farmers in Kansas, while Renew Kansas represents the state’s ethanol industry. For more information, visit kscorn.com and renewkansas.com

 

(Tampa, Fla.) – Global markets for U.S. grains are interconnected and affected by diverse drivers of demand including relationships with major grain users, ever-changing weather and trade policy.

U.S. Grains Council (USGC) members are meeting in Tampa, Fla., this week at the organization’s 17th International Marketing Conference and 60th Annual Membership Meeting to better understand how the Council’s network of global staff anticipate and respond to these factors in more than 50 countries around the world.

After a grueling year that included an ongoing trade war with China, unprecedented weather challenges and a flurry of trade deals with key customers, more than 350 attendees heard the latest developments and predictions from three experts on those topics to anticipate and plan for this year’s season: Ambassador Craig Allen, president of the U.S.-China Business Council; Eric Snodgrass, principal atmospheric scientist at Nutrien Ag Solutions; and Ken Levinson, executive director of the Washington International Trade Association.

“We want stable, long-term buyers in China,” said Ambassador Allen in his opening remarks about the ongoing and developing relationship with one of the United States’ biggest trading partners. “Nothing else is acceptable and we will work to that end.”

Snodgrass spoke to the power of Mother Nature’s long-term weather and climate issues, saying the Corn Belt is getting consistently wetter and farmers will need better tools to manage increased precipitation.

Levinson spoke to the dynamics driving agreements with major partners – China, Mexico, Canada and Japan – and the potential for new measures to gain new market access.

The morning culminated with selected USGC staff members from overseas offices reacting to how these drivers are interconnected and have impacts on trade in the markets in which they work.

Ryan LeGrand, USGC president and CEO, moderated the session of international directors including Alejandra Danielson-Castillo, director in South Asia; Tommy Hamamoto, director in Japan; Marri Tejada, director for the Western Hemisphere; and Manuel Sanchez, director for Southeast Asia.

From a tariff rate quota in Brazil to a new free trade agreement partner – Japan – and potential free trade agreement partner, Vietnam, each director spoke about positive developments in their own countries and regions in addition to how China, weather in the U.S. and trade agreement movements are impacting how they develop markets for U.S. grains, enable trade and improve lives in these places.

“Our expert country and regional directors and their staff members around the world tackle these very challenges every day to expand markets for U.S. grains,” said LeGrand. “They allow us to be successful for the corn, sorghum and barley sector producers who make up our membership.”

“It’s important for our members to hear from these experts as they will move into their Advisory Team meetings to formulate recommendations for moving trade forward in 2020,” said USGC Chairman Darren Armstrong, a farmer from North Carolina. “We appreciate the feedback and input, as well as the strategies provided by our directors scattered around the world working in our markets every day. They send back critical information to us on specific developments so the Council may remain nimble in addressing them.”

Loaded with information from both the morning’s expert speakers and the knowledge provided by the Council’s overseas directors, attendees headed into the first of three in-depth Advisory Team (A-Team) meetings, during which Council members help identify opportunities, set priorities and chart the course for the organization in the coming year.

 

In the next few days, attendees will continue A-Team meetings reviewing the Council’s Unified Export Strategy (UES) and will recognize members and USGC staff for their years of service before ending the week with a Board of Delegates meeting.

The Renewable Fuels Association today released a pair of reports summarizing 2019 U.S. ethanol and distillers grains export and import data. Through a series of charts and graphics, the reports provide industry advocates, policymakers, the media, and general public with the latest information on the important role U.S. ethanol and distillers grains play on the world stage.

 

The export/import trade summary report on ethanol provides annual and monthly data on U.S. ethanol exports, highlighting the fact that 1.47 billion gallons—9.3 percent of the ethanol produced here—were exported in 2019, second only to 2018’s record of 1.7 billion. This ethanol, valued at $2.42 billion, was shipped to more than 70 countries on six continents. Top destinations for U.S. ethanol exports (Brazil ranking first, followed closely by Canada) are also discussed in the report, along with information on the impact of trade barriers on shipments to certain markets.

 

When it comes to ethanol imports, the United States continues to import very little fuel ethanol and remained a net exporter by a large margin in 2019. Maps depicting the leading ports of entry and departure for U.S. ethanol imports and exports are also offered, as are figures showing the annual economic value of U.S. ethanol exports.

 

The second report released today covers U.S. exports of distillers grains, a high-protein co-product of dry mill ethanol production used in feed for livestock and poultry, which totaled 10.79 million metric tons in 2019, the sixth straight year these exports exceeded 10 million metric tons. Mexico remained the top destination for U.S. distillers grains, representing 19 percent; however, U.S. distillers grains exports to China continued to see a significant drop since the country imposed punitive anti-dumping and countervailing duties against U.S. products in 2016. U.S. distillers grains exports had an aggregate value of $2.2 billion in 2019, the fifth highest on record.

 

Although they moderated slightly in 2019, ethanol exports have experienced rapid growth in recent years, and distillers grains exports have sustained their gains from the last decade, despite the challenges presented by trade barriers.

 

China…they are scrapping their ethanol program & what does that mean?  GCI China talks of lifting duties on DDG’s.  Ethanol mandate by 2020, was never bought into.  Due to weather, the USDA report delayed until Friday along with the WASDE report.  Political talk making national news, is the current issues with Iran having any effect on the markets?  ASF hits again in Bulgaria.  Consolidation in the cattle as they wait for the cash to fully develop.

 

LINCOLN, Neb. – Through a new partnership between the Nebraska Corn Board (NCB) and Casey’s General Stores (Casey’s), motorists in the state will have increased access to higher blends of American Ethanol. Through its blender pump incentive infrastructure program, NCB provided grant assistance to help Casey’s upgrade existing fuel pumps to offer Unleaded88, a 15% ethanol blend. Twelve Casey’s locations in Nebraska have been upgraded – nine in Omaha, one in La Vista, one in Papillion and one in Norfolk.

“In an environmentally-conscious world, filling up with ethanol is an easy way for us all to do our part for the planet and our overall health,” said John Greer, District 2 Director of NCB and farmer from Edgar. “Ethanol is a clean-burning, renewable fuel that is less toxic than traditional gasoline, which is good for our air. By investing in our ethanol infrastructure, we’re not only working toward a greener world, but we’re also saving consumers money while boosting Nebraska’s economy. Ethanol is a win for everyone.”

This isn’t the Ankeny, Iowa-based fuel retailer’s first venture into offering higher ethanol blends. This summer, Casey’s added Unleaded88 infrastructure to more than 60 of its locations. In Nebraska, the retailer also began offering E85 at its stores in Ogallala and Cozad.

“We’re offering Unleaded88 at more stores because our guests want it. The benefits of a lower price and higher octane are hard to argue with,” said Jake Comer, fuel pricing manager at Casey’s.

“Unleaded88, or E15, is the most widely tested fuel ever,” said David Bruntz, chairman of the NCB and farmer from Friend. “We know these fuels work well in vehicles and provide countless benefits. The Nebraska Corn Board has worked hard and will continue to work hard to ensure consumers have easy access to these options. We also applaud Casey’s for being an outstanding partner in this process.”

The twelve upgraded Casey’s locations are:

Store # City State Address
2885 Norfolk Nebraska 1020 S 13th Street
2986 Omaha Nebraska 9905 Q Street
2987 Omaha Nebraska 15275 Weir Plaza Street
3813 Papillion Nebraska 9911 S 71st Avenue
3814 Omaha Nebraska 14330 Hillsdale Avenue
3815 Omaha Nebraska 15611 Harrison Street
3816 Omaha Nebraska 3725 N 147th Street
3817 Omaha Nebraska 18280 Wright Street
3818 Omaha Nebraska 250 N 168th Circle
3819 Omaha Nebraska 16960 Evans Plaza
3820 La Vista Nebraska 7828 S 123rd Plaza
3821 Omaha Nebraska 2540 N 90th Street

To find all local fuel retailers offering higher ethanol blends, visit getbiofuel.com.

In addition to its support of Casey’s, the NCB invested in eight other fuel retail locations across the state during this current fiscal year. Each year, fuel retailers wanting to upgrade to blender pumps can fill out a grant application to be considered for the program. For more information, contact the NCB by emailing NCB.info@nebraska.gov.

The Renewable Fuels Association today congratulated member company Badger State Ethanol, which recently produced its one-billionth gallon of ethanol. The dry-mill ethanol plant in Monroe, Wisc., began production in October 2002 and now has the capacity of more than 85 million gallons of ethanol per year.

 

“RFA applauds Badger State on this important milestone and its longtime commitment to the industry,” said RFA President and CEO Geoff Cooper. “All those involved in the operation, from investors to staff, should be very proud of the hard work they all put into a facility that supports the community around them. The company supports dozens of good jobs, adds value to locally grown crops, and plays an important role in providing consumers with cleaner and more affordable fuels at the pump.”

 

“I thank all of the investors who have believed in us, the community that supports us, the consumers who buy our end products, in both ethanol and feed, and the organizations that support the agenda that helps make this possible,” BSE CEO and General Manager Erik Huschitt said. “We certainly didn’t do this alone, and we express our gratitude to all of those who helped us reach this milestone.”

 

Since its inception, BSE has returned value to its local investors, employs 50 people with high-skill, high-wage jobs, and provided a value-added market for area Wisconsin corn producers as well as a local outlet for commercial operations to conduct their grain business. BSE’s 1 billion gallons of ethanol production has provided a market for over 350 million bushels of corn. Click here for more information.