Tag Archives: USDA

Corn silking was pegged at 35% as of Sunday, July 21, still far behind the five-year average of 66%. Corn was rated 57% in good-to-excellent condition, down one percentage point from last week and way down from the 72% rating seen last year at this time, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report. This could be good for the grain bulls as many analysts were expected a 58% good to excellent rating. In a Statewide look Nebraska’s crop was rated at 77% good to excellent, Kansas was rated at 57% good to excellent. The best corn in the nation looks to be in Tennessee with a rating of 85% good to excellent.

Soybeans nationally have reached 40% blooming. A far cry from a year ago’s 76% blooming and about 26% behind the five year average. Soybeans setting pods is also behind nationally at 7%. Nebraska soybeans have set 8% pods, 17% less than a year ago. Kansas soybeans have set 6% pods, 9% behind a year ago. Analysts expected soybeans to be unchanged week to week at 54% good to excellent. The USDA confirmed these numbers. Nebraska’s crop is rated at 73% good to excellent. Kansas is rated at 50% good to excellent.

Winter wheat harvest rolled across Kansas with last week’s heat. Nationally the harvest is still 10% behind at 69% complete. Rains may have delayed a few harvesters in Nebraska as harvest nears 33% complete, as compared to 76% a on the five year average.

Topsoil moisture remained fairly similar with Kansas rated 73% adequate to surplus and Nebraska at 87% adequate to surplus.

Clay Patton breaks down the report here: http://bit.ly/32GiyLb

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

On July 19, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced the allocation of additional funding under USDA’s Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP), a key component of the Trump administration’s trade mitigation package designed to address the adverse effects of retaliatory measures impacting exports of U.S. agricultural products.

The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) is one of 48 organizations that will receive additional ATP funding through the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS). USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom issued the following statement:

While there has been progress in recent weeks in removing retaliatory measures imposed on U.S. red meat exports, the obstacles these products face in international markets are still significant. USMEF greatly appreciates the Trump administration’s authorization of additional ATP funding – an investment that will help USMEF and other organizations defend our existing market share and develop new markets for U.S. agricultural exports.

A new online tool can help farmers and ranchers find information on U.S. Department of Agriculture farm loans that may best fit their operations. USDA has launched the new Farm Loan Discovery Tool as the newest feature on farmers.gov, the Department’s self-service website for farmers.

USDA undersecretary Bill Northey says the tool can “help farmers find information on USDA farm loans within minutes.” The changes are part of customer service improvements effort by USDA, and was identified through suggestions from farmers. USDA’s Farm Service Agency offers a variety of loan options to help farmers finance their operations, from buying land to financing the purchase of equipment.

Compared to this time last year, FSA has seen an 18 percent increase in the amount it has obligated for direct farm ownership loans. Through the 2018 Farm Bill, FSA has increased the limits for several loan products. USDA conducted field research in eight states, gathering input from farmers and FSA farm loan staff to better understand their needs and challenges.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture today announced up to $16 million in available funding to help socially disadvantaged and veteran farmers and ranchers own and operate successful farms. Funding is made through the USDA’s Outreach and Assistance for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers and Veteran Farmers and Ranchers Program (also known as the 2501 Program). The program is administered by the USDA Office of Partnerships and Public Engagement (OPPE).

“All farmers and ranchers deserve equal access to USDA programs and services,” said Mike Beatty, director of the USDA Office of Partnerships and Public Engagement. “2501 grants go a long way in fulfilling our mission to reach historically underserved communities and ensure their equitable participation in our programs.”
For 30 years, the 2501 Program has helped reach socially disadvantaged agricultural producers – farmers and ranchers who have experienced barriers to service due to racial or ethnic prejudice. The 2014 Farm Bill expanded the program’s reach to veterans. The 2018 Farm Bill boosts mandatory funding for the program through FY 2023. With 2501 Program grants, nonprofits, institutions of higher education and Indian Tribes can support underserved and veteran farmers and ranchers through education, training, demonstrations, and conferences on farming and agribusiness, and by increasing access to USDA’s programs and services.
Since 1994, the 2501 Program has awarded 451 grants totaling more than $103 million. Among recent 2501 projects, an FY 2018 grant awarded to the Mississippi Minority Farmers Alliance in Okolona, Mississippi helped agricultural community leaders connect senior farmers and new and beginning farmers to preserve farming legacies. A 2501 grant to Florida International University helped veterans and young urban farmers build sustainable urban agriculture operations in South Florida.
Eligible 2501 Program applicants include not-for-profit organizations, community-based organizations, and a range of higher education institutions serving African-American, American Indian, Alaska Native, Hispanic, Asian, and Pacific Islander communities.
The deadline for applications is August 15, 2019. See the request for applications for full details.

Corn and soybean development continued to lag behind the average pace last week, but conditions for both crops rose slightly, according to the latest USDA NASS Crop Progress report released Monday.

As of Sunday, July 14, an estimated 17% of corn was silking, up 9 percentage points from the previous week but 25 percentage points behind the five-year average of 42%.

Corn condition, estimated at 58% good to excellent, was up 1 percentage point from 57% the previous week. That’s still the lowest good-to-excellent rating for this time of year in seven years.

“Among the top eight corn-producing states, Nebraska has the highest good-to-excellent rating at 77%, while Ohio and Indiana are at the bottom with 38% and 39%, respectively,” said DTN Lead Analyst Todd Hultman. “In Missouri, only 32% of corn was rated good to excellent.”

Soybean development also remained behind normal last week. NASS estimated that 95% of the soybean crop that was planted had emerged as of Sunday, 4 percentage points behind the five-year average of 99%. Twenty-two percent of soybeans were blooming, up 12 percentage points from the previous week but 27 percentage points behind the five-year average of 49%.

The soybean crop’s good-to-excellent rating of 54% was up 1 percentage point from 53% the previous week. As with corn, the soybeans’ good-to-excellent rating is the lowest in seven years.

“Again, Nebraska tops the list with 71% of soybeans rated good to excellent, while Ohio was at 33%,” Hultman said.

Winter wheat harvest moved ahead another 10 percentage points last week to reach 57% complete as of Sunday, behind last year’s 72% and 14 percentage points behind the five-year average of 71%.

“The Kansas harvest is 81% complete, while Missouri, Texas and Oklahoma are all within 4 percentage points of being finished,” Hultman said.

Seventy-eight percent of the spring wheat crop was headed, jumping 22 percentage points from 56% the previous week, but was 9 percentage points behind the five-year average of 87%.

Spring wheat condition was rated 76% good to excellent, down 2 percentage points from the previous week’s 78% good to excellent, but still a high rating for the crop for this time of year, Hultman said.

Twenty-four percent of sorghum was headed, 7 percentage points behind the five-year average of 31%. Sorghum coloring was estimated at 14%, behind the average of 19%. Sorghum condition was rated 74% good to excellent. Oats were 87% headed, behind the average of 95%.

Cotton squaring reached 60% as of Sunday, behind the average pace of 69%. Cotton setting bolls was 20%, also behind the average of 25%. Cotton condition was rated 56% good to excellent, up 2 percentage point from the previous week’s 54% good to excellent. Twenty-four percent of rice was headed, behind the average of 31%. Rice condition was rated 67% good to excellent.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

Clay Patton recaps the report here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-conditions-improve-but-still-behind-7139.html

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Silking 17 8 59 42
Soybeans Emerged 95 90 100 99
Soybeans Blooming 22 10 62 49
Winter Wheat Harvested 57 47 72 71
Spring Wheat Headed 78 56 91 87
Cotton Squaring 60 47 70 69
Cotton Setting Bolls 20 13 30 25
Sorghum Headed 24 22 30 31
Sorghum Coloring 14 13 19 19
Barley Headed 75 55 88 89
Oats Headed 87 74 95 95
Rice Headed 24 16 30 31

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 3 9 30 48 10 3 9 31 47 10 3 6 19 51 21
Soybeans 3 9 34 46 8 3 9 35 46 7 2 6 23 53 16
Spring Wheat 4 20 66 10 3 19 70 8 1 3 16 67 13
Cotton 3 12 29 47 9 2 17 27 47 7 10 18 31 34 7
Sorghum 1 2 23 61 13 1 2 24 61 12 5 12 36 43 4
Barley 5 19 62 14 1 4 22 63 10 1 2 12 70 15
Oats 2 5 25 57 11 2 5 28 56 9 4 3 22 58 13
Rice 1 6 26 50 17 1 6 27 49 17 1 5 25 56 13

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 4 17 67 12 3 12 70 15 13 25 57 5
Subsoil Moisture 3 13 72 12 3 10 70 17 11 26 58 5

More than 50 doctors across the U.S. signed an open letter to the USDA calling on the organization to overhaul the U.S. Dietary Guidelines and ensure that recommendations are for all Americans. The letter ran in both the New York Times and Washington Post today.

Currently, the Advisory Committee is reviewing the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines to begin shaping their recommendations for the USDA and Health and Human Services to consider. They are focused on the healthy population, but only 12 percent of the population is metabolically healthy.1

The open letter was spearheaded by Atkins Nutritionals, Inc., a mission-based organization focused on improving global health, and has actively advocated for the Dietary Guidelines to reflect current, quality science.

The letter highlights that, today, 72 percent of Americans have a body mass index (BMI) in the overweight or obese range2 and 52 percent have either diabetes or prediabetes.3 In addition, it highlights that more than 20 percent of all healthcare spending in the U.S. is on obesity-related illness.4

“We believe that it is critical for the U.S. government to overhaul the U.S. Dietary Guidelines and provide nutrition guidance that uses today’s science and promotes healthier eating habits, recognizing a low-carbohydrate eating approach as a viable option for people. Doing this can improve our nation’s health and reduce medical costs,” said Joseph E. Scalzo, president and chief executive officer, The Simply Good Foods Company. “The Dietary Guidelines have unfortunately taken America down the path of overconsumption of carbohydrates and sugar, resulting in less healthy citizens.”

Atkins Nutritionals, a subsidiary of The Simply Good Foods Company, has actively engaged with government officials, health professionals and other key opinion leaders to help increase awareness of the more than 100 clinical studies spanning the past two decades that show the health benefits of a low-carbohydrate eating approach. In addition, the company’s nutrition experts have presented at public hearings and submitted public comments, detailing the benefits of reducing carbohydrates.

The letter references the National Academics of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s (NASEM) consensus study that recommended that the Guidelines address the needs of all Americans, cautioning against a one-size fits all approach.5 Also highlighted within the letter is American Diabetes Association’s recent recommendation that in addition to other eating approaches, a low-carbohydrate eating approach can help manage diabetes.6

“The ADA’s inclusion of low-carbohydrate eating in its recently published Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes shows how an important health organization is providing such guidance as an option for people battling diabetes,” said Colette Heimowitz, M.Sc., vice president, nutrition and education, Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. “All Americans can benefit from Dietary Guidelines that are based on the best, most recent science available, eschew a one-size-fits-all approach, and make meaningful changes in nutrition recommendations.”

Corn was rated 57% in good-to-excellent condition and soybeans were rated 53% in good-to-excellent condition, as of Sunday, July 7, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report.

In a state by state breakdown Nebraska had the third best corn in the nation at 76% good to excellent. Colorado had the best corn in the nation at 85% good to excellent.

For soybeans Nebraska looks to have the best beans in the nation with a rating of 73% good to excellent. Kentucky close behind at 72% good to excellent. South Dakota on the other  hand is struggling registering just 28% of it’s soybean crop at good to excellent.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Emerged 98 94 100 100
Corn Silking 8 NA 34 22
Soybeans Planted 96 92 100 99
Soybeans Emerged 90 83 100 98
Soybeans Blooming 10 NA 44 32
Winter Wheat Harvested 47 30 61 61
Spring Wheat Headed 56 25 78 73
Cotton Squaring 47 37 57 54
Cotton Setting Bolls 13 7 20 16
Sorghum Planted 97 94 100 99
Sorghum Headed 22 20 25 26
Sorghum Coloring 13 NA 16 16
Barley Headed 55 31 74 75
Oats Headed 74 58 90 90
Rice Headed 16 10 20 22

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 3 9 31 47 10 3 9 32 47 9 2 5 18 54 21
Soybeans 3 9 35 46 7 2 9 35 47 7 2 5 22 55 16
Winter Wheat 3 7 26 47 17 3 7 27 48 15 15 19 29 28 9
Spring Wheat 3 19 70 8 1 3 21 67 8 1 3 16 66 14
Cotton 2 17 27 47 7 5 13 30 45 7 8 19 32 34 7
Sorghum 1 2 24 61 12 2 25 63 10 4 11 34 46 5
Barley 1 4 22 63 10 1 4 23 64 8 1 2 12 68 17
Oats 2 5 28 56 9 2 5 28 56 9 3 3 21 60 13
Rice 1 6 27 49 17 1 4 27 54 14 1 5 22 59 13

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 3 12 70 15 2 10 69 19 10 20 62 8
Subsoil Moisture 3 10 70 17 2 9 69 20 10 22 62 6

Ninety-two percent of intended soybean acres were planted as of Sunday, June 30, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report. NASS has stopped reporting corn planting progress for the season, but reported that corn emergence was at 94%. For the portion of the crops that had emerged, corn was rated 56% in good-to-excellent condition and soybeans were rated 54% in good-to-excellent condition.

Check this page throughout the afternoon for additional highlights from this week’s report.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

Clay Patton recaps the full report here: http://bit.ly/2J50iUd

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Emerged 94 89 100 100
Soybeans Planted 92 85 100 99
Soybeans Emerged 83 71 98 95
Winter Wheat Headed 97 94 100 100
Winter Wheat Harvested 30 15 50 48
Spring Wheat Headed 25 7 55 52
Cotton Squaring 37 30 41 39
Cotton Setting Bolls 7 3 11 9
Sorghum Planted 94 84 98 96
Sorghum Headed 20 17 22 23
Barley Headed 31 9 47 52
Oats Headed 58 43 80 81
Rice Headed 10 5 14 15

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 3 9 32 47 9 3 9 32 48 8 2 4 18 55 21
Soybeans 2 9 35 47 7 2 8 36 47 7 1 5 23 55 16
Winter Wheat 3 7 27 48 15 3 8 28 46 15 15 19 29 28 9
Spring Wheat 1 3 21 67 8 3 22 67 8 1 4 18 64 13
Cotton 5 13 30 45 7 4 13 33 45 5 6 18 33 36 7
Sorghum 2 25 63 10 3 25 61 11 3 12 32 49 4
Barley 1 4 23 64 8 1 4 23 64 8 1 2 13 66 18
Oats 2 5 28 56 9 2 5 29 56 8 3 3 21 60 13
Rice 1 4 27 54 14 1 6 27 52 14 5 24 56 15

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 2 10 69 19 2 8 64 26 9 18 62 11
Subsoil Moisture 2 9 69 20 2 8 65 25 9 20 62 9

USDA Undersecretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey says more than 5,000 dairy operations have signed up for the new Dairy Margin Coverage Program.

The exact number was 5,364 as of last Thursday afternoon. Northey says about 40,000 dairy operations are eligible to enroll, but overall he’s pleased with the number of producers who’ve signed up since June 17. The DMC, created by the 2018 Farm Bill, replaces the Margin Protection Program for Dairy, which many producers didn’t like.

The Hagstrom Report says the new program will make payments to dairy producers when the difference between the all-milk price and the average feed cost (the margin) falls below a certain dollar amount, which is selected by each producer when they sign up for the program.

Northey did say the DMC will not solve all the problems of the dairy industry but told reporters last week that it “offers a little bit of support in a challenging time.” The program is retroactive to January first, while USDA is hopeful of making payments soon. The White House Office of Management and Budget is still working on approving all the details of the program.

In July, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will collect updated information on 2019 acres planted to corn, cotton, sorghum, and soybeans in 14 states.

NASS previously collected planted acreage information during the first two weeks of June, with the results published in the June 28 Acreage report. Excessive rainfall had prevented planting at the time of the survey, leaving a portion of acres still to be planted for corn in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin; cotton in Arkansas; sorghum in Kansas; and soybeans in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

If the newly collected data justify any changes, NASS will publish updated acreage estimates in the Crop Production report to be released at noon ET on Monday, Aug. 12. It will be available online at www.nass.usda.gov/Publications.