Tag Archives: cattle

ARLINGTON, Va. – The National Milk Producers Federation today marked the one-year anniversary of then-FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb’s famous observation that “almonds don’t lactate” by reminding the agency it still has not resolved the issue and that citizens who heeded its call for comments with thoughtful responses deserve answers.

“An almond doesn’t lactate, I must confess,” Gottlieb said last July 17, admitting that FDA has been lax in enforcing its own rules on the use of dairy terms on products containing no dairy ingredients. “Have we been enforcing our standard of identity? The answer is, probably not,” he said, while pledging agency action in “something close to a year.”

“FDA’s longstanding inaction on enforcing its own standards of identity is perpetuating the marketing of products using milk and dairy terms when those products don’t match the nutritional content of the dairy products they are imitating,” said Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of NMPF. “Dairy farmers have never called for bans on fake-food competitors, nor have they called for market censorship. They do want the FDA to enforce its own rules defining what a product is and what it isn’t, in keeping with similar standards enforced in other countries around the globe. The clock is still ticking. We are not going away.”

The FDA in January concluded a comment period exploring the issue of consumer confusion regarding the nutritional content of dairy products versus plant-based imitators, with organizations including the American Academy of Pediatrics offering evidence of nutritional deficiencies caused by confusion over the contents of plant-based versus dairy beverages while dairy’s detractors submitted thousands of off-topic creeds. After carefully considering comments and noting consumer survey data that clearly demonstrates confusion over nutrition, NMPF in Februaryreleased its own road map offering solutions to how public health, product integrity and free speech could be protected through updated regulations. That Citizen Petition is currently open for comment.

NMPF also supports the DAIRY PRIDE Act, a potential legislative prod for FDA action.

With the beef industry going through continuous changes and advancements, it is important cattlemen and women across the country are “in the know”, which is where the Cattlemen’s Education Series (CES) comes into play. This partnership between the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association(NCBA) is designed to provide resources to NCBA state and breed affiliates through a grant which allows them to extend outstanding educational experiences locally. The mission of the CES is to provide cutting-edge information to beef producers that contributes to increased knowledge, profitability and sustainability.

 

With approximately 32 percent of the Nation’s 2018 corn crop being utilized as animal feed, this partnership is important as it promotes corn products and by-products utilized in the cattle industry.

 

“I understand the importance of being able to deliver a quality product for my customers,” said Missouri farmer Gary Porter. “I take pride knowing the crop I grow will end up in so many outlets.”

 

Porter also serves as the liaison to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association for the National Corn Growers Association. “Our ability to produce an abundant and high-quality crop, makes corn an attractive feedstock for current and future end users.”

 

The recent advances in corn fractionation technology, provides the opportunity for more tailored, species specific distillers feed products, in addition to the great value that present DDGS bring today.

 

“As a cattle producer, I have confidence in the U.S. corn crop and the value that corn and DDGS bring to my cattle and operation,” said NCBA Vice President Jerry Bohn. “It is good to see the various partnerships from NCGA and the state corn affiliates to increase beef demand, especially exports through USMEF. NCGA also shows their commitment to cattlemen via the Cattlemen Education Series grant program that supports cutting edge education for beef producers that contributes to their increased knowledge, profitability and sustainability.”

 

Although the NCGA funded grant program is still young, NCBA has awarded over forty CES grants across the country. Look for upcoming CES events in your area.

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) today sent a letter signed by 39 of its state affiliates to U.S. Senate and House leaders urging them to support the swift ratification of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

The letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy is NCBA’s latest salvo in the battle to build support for USMCA ratification, coming less than two weeks after the group launched a new media campaign to push the accord.

“American cattle producers need to maintain our unrestricted, duty-free access to markets in Canada and Mexico, and that’s exactly what USMCA would guarantee us,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. “Jeopardizing that access by having Congress not take action on USMCA is simply not an option for us.”

In addition to calling on Congress to quickly ratify USMCA, the letter also encouraged the Capitol Hill leaders to oppose efforts to re-instate failed policies of the past, such as mandatory country-of-origin labeling, or MCOOL.

“MCOOL was U.S. law for six years until it was repealed by Congress in 2015 to avoid $1 billion of retaliatory tariffs from Canada and Mexico that were sanctioned by the World Trade Organization (WTO),” the letter says. “The truth is MCOOL cost the U.S. beef industry hundreds of millions of dollars to implement, and the vast majority of consumers never paid attention to it. Our industry has suffered enough with this bad idea and we do not need to relive the sins of the past.”

Click here to read the full letter, and click here to view NCBA’s “Faces of USMCA” media campaign, which launched in June.

Thirteen auction market members of the Livestock Marketing Association (LMA) hosted the sale of a roll-over auction animal earlier this spring to support Nebraska flood relief efforts. The livestock sales, which took place across Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming raised more than $230,000 worth of proceeds.

 

Member markets who hosted roll-over sales included Alma Livestock Auction, Alma, Neb.; Atkinson Livestock, Atkinson, Neb.; Basset Livestock, Bassett, Neb.; Beatrice 77 Livestock Sales, Beatrice, Neb.; Columbus Sales Pavilion, Columbus, Neb.; Elgin Livestock, Elgin, Neb.; Fullerton Livestock Market, Fullerton, Neb.; Huss Livestock Market LLC, Kearney, Neb.; Sheridan Livestock, Rushville, Neb.; St. Onge Livestock, St. Onge, S.D.; Torrington Livestock Market, Torrington, Wyo.; Verdigre Stockyards; Verdigre, Neb.; Wahoo Livestock Sales, Wahoo, Neb.; and West Point Stockyards, West Point, Neb.

 

One LMA member who hosted a roll-over benefit auction was directly affected by the floods. Lu Rieken, owner of Fullerton Livestock Market, says there was less than an hour warning before flood waters hit their business. With 4.5 feet of standing water inside the market, damage from water and debris to the market was extensive.

 

Despite facing damage themselves, Fullerton Livestock Market chose to participate in a roll-over auction to assist relief efforts across the state.

 

“Our philosophy is that it’s not how far or how hard you fall, it’s how fast you get back up,” Lu Rieken says. “We weren’t the only ones suffering. Everyone was and we wanted them to know we put them first.”

 

A majority of the funds raised by participating member markets were contributed to the Nebraska Cattlemen Disaster Relief Fund or directly to feed, fencing and hauling needs of individuals. Some markets chose to serve as pick-up sites for producers to access feed, hay and other supplies.

 

Pete McClymont, Executive Vice President of the Nebraska Cattlemen Association, says the contributions given to the relief fund by LMA member markets were overwhelming.

 

“When I see Dennis Henrichs, with Beatrice 77 Livestock Sales, enter our office with an envelope full of donations, it just about makes you cry,” McClymont says. “It makes you feel good about mankind to know people are sitting in the seats of these markets bidding, saying ‘Yes, I want to help.’”

 

According to McClymont, all proceeds received by the Nebraska Cattlemen Disaster Relief Fund will be distributed back to those who completed an application for need. The LMA also contributed $3,000 to each participating member market’s total donations raised.

 

USDA Undersecretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey says more than 5,000 dairy operations have signed up for the new Dairy Margin Coverage Program.

The exact number was 5,364 as of last Thursday afternoon. Northey says about 40,000 dairy operations are eligible to enroll, but overall he’s pleased with the number of producers who’ve signed up since June 17. The DMC, created by the 2018 Farm Bill, replaces the Margin Protection Program for Dairy, which many producers didn’t like.

The Hagstrom Report says the new program will make payments to dairy producers when the difference between the all-milk price and the average feed cost (the margin) falls below a certain dollar amount, which is selected by each producer when they sign up for the program.

Northey did say the DMC will not solve all the problems of the dairy industry but told reporters last week that it “offers a little bit of support in a challenging time.” The program is retroactive to January first, while USDA is hopeful of making payments soon. The White House Office of Management and Budget is still working on approving all the details of the program.

QUESTION:

Our corral is past due for replacing, and I want to do it right. We have a small herd and can’t spend a fortune. Do you have any plans or tips that might help me?

ANSWER:

There are lots of options, and many companies even offer complete packages. The packages can be pricy, and there are often less-expensive ways to build a working facility for a small operation.

Start with a blank sheet of paper and an open mind. Look for plans on the internet and through your Extension service. Consider your Extension agent and other producers as valuable resources as you progress through this project. Remember, the goal of any facility is to make cattle want to go where you want them to go with as little stress on bovine and human as possible.

Location should be your first decision. The area needs to be well-drained and easily accessible to all your pastures. Electricity and water are nice to have, if possible.

You need a holding area to gather cattle before moving them into crowding pens leading to the alley. If this is an area where cattle normally come for water, feed or mineral, this makes gathering easier. Lanes leading from pastures to this gathering area can also be helpful.

The single biggest mistake I have seen during the years is making the alley leading up to the chute or head-catch too wide. Many years ago, we had a producer spend thousands of dollars building a new facility. When we arrived, he proudly drove his four-wheeler down the alley to the chute to greet me. We did not get his cattle worked until he reworked everything.

For most producers in our area, we recommend the alley be 26 to 28 inches wide. That looks narrow, but it is a good rule of thumb. If you have very large cattle, you may need to adapt a bit. It’s best if the alley is adjustable, allowing you to work calves or cows at the optimum width.

Another design tip I think is almost essential is a circular tub with a heavy-duty swing gate from 10 feet to 12 feet. This allows you to gently push cattle into the chute. You want curved alleys with solid surfaces where cattle cannot see what is going on in front, or to the side, of them. This reduces stress and encourages forward movement. A covering over at least part of the working area provides much-appreciated protection from the elements.

These are just a few tips. I invite our readers to write or email us what they have learned (good and bad) during the years. It’s always great to get new ideas.

The first anthrax case of the year was confirmed in one captive antelope on a premises in Uvalde County on June 19, 2019.

“The premises is located within the triangular area of Texas where anthrax is historically found in the soil,” said Dr. Susan Rollo, State Epidemiologist. “There is an effective anthrax vaccine available for use in susceptible livestock in high risk areas. We encourage you to consult with your local veterinary practitioner.”

The premises has been placed under quarantine and the premises will not be released from quarantine until the animals on the premises have been vaccinated and the affected carcasses are properly disposed of, as outlined in TAHC’s rules.

Anthrax is a bacterial disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which is a naturally occurring organism with worldwide distribution, including certain parts of Texas. The bacteria can surface, contaminating soil and grass after periods of wet, cool weather, followed by hot, dry conditions. During these conditions, animals ingest the anthrax bacteria when they consume contaminated grass and hay, or by inhaling the spores. Outbreaks will usually end when cooler weather arrives.

Acute fever followed by rapid death with bleeding from body openings are common signs of anthrax in livestock. Carcasses may also appear bloated and decompose quickly. Livestock or animals displaying symptoms consistent with anthrax should be reported to a private veterinary practitioner or a TAHC official.

Producers are encouraged to follow basic sanitation precautions when handling affected livestock or carcasses. It is recommended to wear protective gloves, long sleeve shirts and to wash thoroughly afterward to prevent accidental spread of the bacteria to people.

For more information about Anthrax, visit www.tahc.texas.gov/news/brochures/TAHCBrochure_Anthrax.pdf, or contact your local TAHC region office, or visit www.tahc.texas.gov.

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.7 million head on June 1, 2019. The inventory was 2% above June 1, 2018. This is the highest June 1 inventory since the series began in 1996, USDA reported on Friday.

Placements in feedlots during May totaled 2.06 million head, 3% below 2018. Net placements were 1.99 million head. During May, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 370,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 305,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 500,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 539,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 235,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 115,000 head.

Marketings of fed cattle during May totaled 2.07 million head, 1% above 2018.  Other disappearance totaled 72,000 head during May, 1% below 2018.

“June 1 cattle on feed data appears to be neutral to slightly bearish following slightly higher overall numbers of cattle in feedlots during the month of May,” said DTN Analyst Rick Kment. “Cattle on feed levels increased 2% from a year ago, fractionally above expected levels, but well within analysts’ ranges. Cattle placed in feedlots during May is 97% of a year ago, but nearly 4 percentage points above pre-report estimates. This is expected to put slight pressure on the cattle complex Monday.

“Given the already weak market structure of the cattle futures complex, these numbers are not expected to be a significant factor, but will add another layer of market concern to the entire complex.”

**

The report is also available at https://www.nass.usda.gov/….

Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, breaks down the report here: http://bit.ly/2N1XRpf

USDA Actual Average Guess Range
On Feed June 1 102.0% 101.3% 101.0-101.9%
Placed in May 97.0% 95.9% 93.2-98.9%
Marketed in May 101.0% 100.8% 99.8-101.1%

An invasion of gnats is presenting a risk to the health and lives of livestock in a southern Minnesota town.

The Mankato Free Press reports that gnats cause weight loss and stress for any animal with their bites and by gathering around eyes and in airways.

Brooke Knisley, who runs an organic produce farm with her husband in St. Peter, says one of her friends has lost 16 chickens to the gnats this year. Knisley says she’s trying to reduce the risk for her own flock by running fans in the chicken coop, hanging fly strips and placing vanilla-soaked rags near where the gnats congregate.

Gnats are also an irritant for cattle and horses, and many owners are keeping their animals inside until the invasion passes.

LINCOLN –Governor Pete Ricketts issued a statement blasting a new initiative by New York City (NYC) Mayor Bill de Blasio that proposes to reduce beef consumption by 50 percent and end the use of processed meat in NYC’s municipal facilities.

“Bill de Blasio’s war on beef is anti-agriculture and anti-science,” said Governor Ricketts.  “Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers are the original conservationists, and they help raise the best beef in the world.  I know the people of New York City enjoy Nebraska beef, because the Department of Agriculture and I have worked to promote Nebraska beef in the city.  I urge the people of New York to reject this senseless plan.”