Tag Archives: cattle

MOLINE, Kan. — Kansas Cattlemen’s Association (KCA) will hold a regional cattle producer’s meeting in Moline, Kansas on May 2, 2018. The meeting will take place at the Moline Grade School/Hornet’s Nest gymnasium and will begin at 6:30 pm. A free USA-Beef meal will be served.

The meeting will include policy presentations as well as an animal genetics seminar. An expert veterinarian and President of SEK Genetics, Dr. Don Coover, will discuss genetics services provided by SEK Genetics. SEK Genetics is unique in the fact that they provide a variety of testing services to producers, including the bioPRYN blood pregnancy test (cattle, bison, goats/sheep), testing for PI-BVD, Neosporosis carriers, Bovine Leukosis (BLV) carriers, Johne’s testing, CAE (goats), and more. These new technologies available to producers can help better manage herds, avoid disease conditions and make herds more profitable.

KCA staff will provide a policy presentation. KCA will provide an updated review of active legislation and regulations during the meeting, as well as other projects in the pipeline for KCA.

The meeting is free and open to the public. Attendees are encouraged to bring along fellow cattle producers. To ensure enough food is available, those planning to attend are asked to call the KCA offices at 785-238-1483 or email cowsrus@kansascattlemen.com to rsvp.

This event has been made possible by these generous sponsors: Goode Ranch, Mills Cattle, PrairieLand Partners, Flyin’ 3 Veterinary Service, Idexx Laboratories, RCB Bank, SEK Genetics, Eureka Livestock Sales, Family Tree Meats, Prairieland Vet Services, Mills Feed & Supply, Howard State Bank, State Auto Farm & Ranch Insurance, WaterTight Roofing, R-Bar Cattle Co. – Ronnie & Wah-Leeta Rogers.

KEARNEY – The Kearney Bound program changed Bryan Escobar’s life.

The University of Nebraska at Kearney senior grew up in Lexington, where his parents worked at the Tyson meatpacking plant. They made enough money to get by, but paying for a university education would have been a stretch.

“They were always pushing for me to get a higher education,” said Escobar, whose parents emigrated to the United States from Central America more than two decades ago.

“They kind of pressured us to look for scholarships, to apply for scholarships and to do good in school,” he said.

Escobar, whose father passed away during his senior year of high school, found his opportunity through the Kearney Bound program.

The initiative started in 2006 opens the door for more first-generation college students to attend UNK by providing scholarships that cover the full cost of tuition, books, fees and room and board for up to five years.

Kearney Bound Scholars, who are selected through a competitive process during their freshman year of high school, receive academic advising, tutoring, mentoring and other educational opportunities to help them prepare for college. That support continues during their time at UNK.

“If it weren’t for Kearney Bound, I don’t think I’d be attending college right now,” Escobar said of the program that accepts students from Lexington, North Platte, Kearney Public and Kearney Catholic high schools who are Pell Grant-eligible and maintain certain academic standards.

Escobar, who discovered an interest in technology and computers prior to graduating from Lexington High School in 2014, is majoring in information networking and telecommunications at UNK.

“It comes naturally to me,” he said, adding that he enjoys the problem-solving aspect of the field.

That should come in handy next month when the 22-year-old begins his internship with Turnkey Computer Systems, a Texas-based company that provides management and accounting systems for the cattle feeding industry. Turnkey applications and systems track more than 10 million head of cattle each year in 18 states and Canada, according to the company’s website.

Escobar will work from the Kearney office as a field support technician, heading to feedlots and cattle operations to assist with troubleshooting and other tasks.

“It’s kind of like IT on the road,” he said.

The internship turns into a full-time position when he graduates from UNK this summer.

Escobar, a member of the Sigma Lambda Beta fraternity, gives credit to UNK and the relationships he built with professors and fellow Lopers for his growth over the past four years.

“I’ve taken so much away from this community and I hope I can share some of my experiences,” he said.

A Missouri Man has been indicted on a cattle-investment scheme that defrauded 89 investors out of $4.7 million dollars. Cameron Hager of Clinton, Missouri, was charged with a nine-count federal indictment that alleges he persuaded investors to put money into a cattle fund that he said would be used to buy cattle and sell them later at a substantial profit. Hager operated the scheme from July of 2015 to March of 2018.

Court documents say he never purchased any animals and never intended to. He received roughly $4.7 million from investors, who gave amounts ranging from $1,000 to $267,000. Hager also roped in others to recruit investors and paid their commissions from the investment money he received. He also used some of the funds for personal expenses, like mortgage payments, paying taxes, and travel expenses. He also used some funds to provide “returns” to other investors.

 

Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s monthly cattle-on-feed report, released at 3:00 p.m. ET Friday, and analysts’ estimates as compiled by the Wall Street Journal. In million head. Numbers USDA’s Average Range 2018 2017 estimated of analysts’ of analysts’ % of prev yr estimates estimates On-feed Mar 1 11.715M 10.772M 109 108.2 107.6- 109.2 Placed in Feb 1.817M 1.694M 107 104.4 100.3- 108.8 Marketed in Feb 1.675M 1.648M 102 101.2 99.8- 102.1 Note: USDA rounds its estimates to the nearest whole number.

Cattle on Feed Jerry Stowell 3-23

ITHACA, N.Y. — A major study led by Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine researchers reveals for the first time that water troughs on farms are a conduit for the spread of toxic E. coli in cattle, which can then spread the pathogen to people through bacteria in feces. The study was recently published in the journal PLOS ONE.

“Water troughs appeared in our mathematical model as a place where water can get contaminated and a potential place where we could break the cycle,” said Renata Ivanek, associate professor of epidemiology and the paper’s senior author. The hypothesis was then tested in the field – with surprising results.

People commonly acquire infections from shiga toxin-producing E. coli through cow feces-contaminated beef and salad greens. The main shiga toxin-producing strain, E. coli 0157:H7, causes more than 63,000 illnesses per year and about 20 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Though cows carry and spread E. coli 0157:H7 when they defecate, the bacteria do not make them sick.

“Farmers do not see a problem because there are no clinical signs in cows; it is totally invisible,” Ivanek said.

A vaccine to reduce bacterial shedding in cows exists, but the beef industry has little incentive to use it, partly due to cost, and the industry does not benefit from labeling beef as “E. colisafe,” Ivanek said. So Ivanek and a research team of 20 co-authors conducted a study to identify other ways to reduce the bacteria’s prevalence in cattle, which can vary over the year from zero to 100 percent of cows in a feedlot carrying the bacteria, with rates generally rising in the summer.

The group ran control trials in a feedlot over two summers. This involved reducing the water volume in troughs in randomly selected treatment pens and leaving the volume unchanged in control pens. They expected that reducing the water levels in troughs would prevent the spread of E. coli. Instead they found that it increased spread; in the treatment pens, the odds of finding shiga toxin-producing E. coli in cows was about 30 percent higher than in the control pens.

“Our modeling studies did pick up the right parts of the system,” Ivanek said, “but the mechanism that we postulated is the opposite from what we thought.”

More research is needed to determine why more water in troughs reduced E. coli in cows, but Ivanek questions whether the lower volume made it easier for cows to swallow debris at the bottom of tanks, or whether a fuller tank reduced E. coli concentrations.

Next steps include repeating the results in other feedlots, evaluating the effectiveness and cost benefit of using more water to reduce E. coli, investigating how seasons and temperatures play a role in prevalence of E. coli, and understanding the actual mechanisms that led to the results.

–Cornell University
via EurekAlert!

There is no simple, one-trick fix when it comes to fly control. In fact, it’s better to think in terms of fly management and IPM rather than control. IPM, or integrated pest management, is key because it allows producers to manage around resistance. It’s not as simple as rotating products, because the same chemical class is used across many types of control methods and product names. It can get confusing fast.

John Cothren, a livestock and field crops specialist with North Carolina State University Extension, wants producers to know: “You will never have 100% fly control, but you can manage them.”

Cothren says in his area, most producers use a combination of fly tags and pour-ons. He stresses the importance of removing those tags at season’s end.

“We are also beginning to see more use of the feedthroughs in minerals,” he adds. “Producers I work with are telling me they are seeing positive effects from those. I think the key there is that you have to start feeding them before fly season and extend it past fly season. If you wait till you have a problem, they aren’t effective. Essentially, you are breaking the life cycle of the fly, so you really need to get ahead of it.”

When To Treat

In beef operations, the horn fly is the pest of most concern economically. The University of Florida reports cattle affected by horn flies can lose 0.3 to 0.5 pounds daily. In a 30-head herd, that adds up to more than $500 each month left unchecked.

Treatment for horn flies, aside from feedthroughs, should be based on economic thresholds established at 200 flies per animal. Rotate chemistries around pyrethroids, organophosphates and feedthroughs. Sometimes, that can become confusing. Different active ingredients aren’t the same as different chemical classes.

For example, the active ingredients permethrin, fenvalerate, resmethrin and flucythrinate are pyrethroids. And, the active ingredients in Rabon, Corathon and the ingredient coumaphos are organophosphates. Diflubenzuron is a larvicide used as an insect growth regulator (IGR) feed additive. So, don’t assume different brands equal different active ingredients. If it’s unclear, check with your county agent or herd veterinarian.

Sprays, Pour-Ons And Rubs

These products give a fast knockdown, but residual is limited. In the case of a pour-on, or drench, the product is poured along the spine. Control lasts about 28 days. Sprays may be more easily washed off. Check labels to see how often a product can be safely applied and note what insecticide class it is in.

Fly Tags

The ease of use for fly tags can make it tempting to not always follow through on the basics. So, while commonly used, they are sometimes left on cattle too long or put in at the wrong time for maximum effectiveness. Tags have a limited period of usefulness and should only be put in when economic thresholds have been reached. Remove fly tags when the season ends. Leaving fly tags in past the point of maximum effectiveness hastens the development of resistance in the fly population.

Feedthroughs And Boluses

IGRs, or larvicides, have been around for decades. They reduce the percentage of horn fly eggs that hatch in manure and are a good fit in herds in isolated areas, and away from other herds where IGR programs are not in place. Feed an IGR 30 days after the first frost in the fall and 30 days before the last frost in the spring.

Biologicals

Parasitic wasps, predaceous mites and beetles, and other biological agents are being used in any operations across the country now. Biologicals need to be applied multiple times throughout the season and are more commonly used around barns and homes. They treat the environment not the animal.

Maintenance

Manure management and good drainage go a long way in helping to limit the development of large populations of both house and stable flies.

There is no simple, one-trick fix when it comes to fly control. In fact, it’s better to think in terms of fly management and IPM rather than control. IPM, or integrated pest management, is key because it allows producers to manage around resistance. It’s not as simple as rotating products, because the same chemical class is used across many types of control methods and product names. It can get confusing fast.

John Cothren, a livestock and field crops specialist with North Carolina State University Extension, wants producers to know: “You will never have 100% fly control, but you can manage them.”

Cothren says in his area, most producers use a combination of fly tags and pour-ons. He stresses the importance of removing those tags at season’s end.

“We are also beginning to see more use of the feedthroughs in minerals,” he adds. “Producers I work with are telling me they are seeing positive effects from those. I think the key there is that you have to start feeding them before fly season and extend it past fly season. If you wait till you have a problem, they aren’t effective. Essentially, you are breaking the life cycle of the fly, so you really need to get ahead of it.”

When To Treat

In beef operations, the horn fly is the pest of most concern economically. The University of Florida reports cattle affected by horn flies can lose 0.3 to 0.5 pounds daily. In a 30-head herd, that adds up to more than $500 each month left unchecked.

Treatment for horn flies, aside from feedthroughs, should be based on economic thresholds established at 200 flies per animal. Rotate chemistries around pyrethroids, organophosphates and feedthroughs. Sometimes, that can become confusing. Different active ingredients aren’t the same as different chemical classes.

For example, the active ingredients permethrin, fenvalerate, resmethrin and flucythrinate are pyrethroids. And, the active ingredients in Rabon, Corathon and the ingredient coumaphos are organophosphates. Diflubenzuron is a larvicide used as an insect growth regulator (IGR) feed additive. So, don’t assume different brands equal different active ingredients. If it’s unclear, check with your county agent or herd veterinarian.

Sprays, Pour-Ons And Rubs

These products give a fast knockdown, but residual is limited. In the case of a pour-on, or drench, the product is poured along the spine. Control lasts about 28 days. Sprays may be more easily washed off. Check labels to see how often a product can be safely applied and note what insecticide class it is in.

Fly Tags

The ease of use for fly tags can make it tempting to not always follow through on the basics. So, while commonly used, they are sometimes left on cattle too long or put in at the wrong time for maximum effectiveness. Tags have a limited period of usefulness and should only be put in when economic thresholds have been reached. Remove fly tags when the season ends. Leaving fly tags in past the point of maximum effectiveness hastens the development of resistance in the fly population.

Feedthroughs And Boluses

IGRs, or larvicides, have been around for decades. They reduce the percentage of horn fly eggs that hatch in manure and are a good fit in herds in isolated areas, and away from other herds where IGR programs are not in place. Feed an IGR 30 days after the first frost in the fall and 30 days before the last frost in the spring.

Biologicals

Parasitic wasps, predaceous mites and beetles, and other biological agents are being used in any operations across the country now. Biologicals need to be applied multiple times throughout the season and are more commonly used around barns and homes. They treat the environment not the animal.

Maintenance

Manure management and good drainage go a long way in helping to limit the development of large populations of both house and stable flies.